September 12, 2019. Parental Migration Critically Affects Non-cognitive Development of Children in Rural China’. New GLO Discussion Paper.

A new GLO Discussion Paper finds that parental migration has a significant negative effect on children’s non-cognitive development.

The Global Labor Organization (GLO) is an independent, non-partisan and non-governmental organization that functions as an international network and virtual platform to stimulate global research, debate and collaboration.

GLO Discussion Paper No. 395, 2019

Parental Migration, Investment in Children, and Children’s Non-cognitive Development: Evidence from Rural China – Download PDF
by Jiang, Hanchen & Yang, Xi

GLO Affiliate Hanchen Jiang

Author Abstract: Many children worldwide are left behind by parents who are migrating for work. While previous literature has studied the effect of parental migration on children’s educational outcomes and cognitive achievements, this study focuses on how parental migration affects children’s non-cognitive development. We use longitudinal data of children in rural China and adopt labor market conditions in destination provinces as instrumental variables for parental endogenous migration choice. We find that parental migration has a significant negative effect on children’s non-cognitive development. Differentiating inter- and intra-provincial migrations suggests that the negative effect of parental migration is mainly driven by inter-provincial migrations. We test four different mechanisms of how parental migration affects child development including parental financial inputs, parental time inputs, household bargaining, and children’s own time input. Our results provide insights into the relative importance of different mechanisms in determining the effect of parental migration on children’s non-cognitive skill formation.

GLO Discussion Papers are research and policy papers of the GLO Network which are widely circulated to encourage discussion. Provided in cooperation with EconStor, a service of the ZBW – Leibniz Information Centre for Economics, GLO Discussion Papers are among others listed in RePEc (see IDEAS,  EconPapers)Complete list of all GLO DPs – downloadable for free.

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Posted in News, Research | Comments Off on September 12, 2019. Parental Migration Critically Affects Non-cognitive Development of Children in Rural China’. New GLO Discussion Paper.

9/11 Memorial

18th anniversary. See also.

The chart shows the number of World Trade Center-related FDNY deaths by year.

See statista.

“July finally saw the long and drawn out battle to compensate 9/11’s ill first responders come to an end. President Trump signed a permanent extension of the Victim Compensation Fund into law which effectively authorizes billions of dollars to cover surviving first responders for the rest of their lives. A grim new statistic reported by ABC News highlights just how important it was to get that legislation passed. Officials recently stated that 241 NYPD officers died in the 18 years since 9/11 – 10 times more than the 23 killed during the attacks.

Firefighters are also experiencing devastation and in July, officials in New York reported that the 200th FDNY member had passed away due to a World Trade Center-related illness. 343 firefighters died during the attacks and 204 more have now succumbed to illness according to the Uniformed Firefighters Association of New York. Cancer and respiratory diseases have caused the most deaths over the past 18 years but new research suggests that first responders also have higher rates of cardiovascular disease. Published in the medical journal JAMA Network Open, it found that the first firefighters on the scene were 44 percent more likely to develop cardiovascular disease than those who arrived a day later.”

See for references statista.

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September 11, 2019. “Income Inequality and the Size of Government in Europe” is the GLO Discussion Paper of the Month in August.

The GLO Discussion Paper of the Month of August finds that government redistribution through expenditures is a useful tool capable of reducing net income inequality, and even more effectively than has been predicted by previous studies.   

GLO Discussion Papers are research and policy papers of the GLO Network which are widely circulated to encourage discussion. Provided in cooperation with EconStor, a service of the ZBW – Leibniz Information Centre for Economics, GLO Discussion Papers are among others listed in RePEc (see IDEAS, EconPapers)Complete list of all GLO DPs downloadable for free.

GLO Discussion Paper of the Month: August

GLO Discussion Paper No. 381, 2019

Income Inequality and the Size of Government: A Causal Analysis – Download PDF
by Guzi, Martin & Kahanec, Martin  

GLO Fellows Martin Guzi & Martin Kahanec 

Author Abstract:  Expansion of the public sector and redistributive policies may reduce income inequality, but formal tests suffer from the problem of endogeneity of government size with respect to the distribution of income. Studying 30 European countries over the period 2004-2015, we apply instrumental variable estimation techniques to identify a causal relationship between income inequality and government size, measured as the government expenditure share in GDP. Using a novel instrument – the number of political parties in the ruling coalition – we find that accounting for the possible endogeneity of government size increases the magnitude of the estimated negative effects. Our findings thus suggest that much of the literature underestimates the true role of the government in attenuating income inequality. The estimated relationship between income inequality and government size persists in a series of robustness checks.

GLO Discussion Papers of August 2019

391 Turkish University Students’ Self-Perceptions of Aging: An Analysis Over Socio-Economic Dimensions – Download PDF
by Yumurtaci, Aynur & Bagis, Bilal

390 The Impact of Exposure to Missionaries on the English Language Proficiency and Earnings of Immigrants in the USA – Download PDF
by Larsen, Nicholas & Chiswick, Barry R.

389 On the road to integration? Immigrant’s demand for informal (& formal) education – Download PDF
by Coniglio, Nicola D. & Hoxhaj, Rezart & Jayet, Hubert

388 Divorce among European and Mexican Immigrants in the U.S – Download PDF
by Chiswick, Barry R. & Houseworth, Christina A

387 A Simple Solution to the Problem of Independence of Irrelevant Alternatives in Choo and Siow Marriage Market Model  Download PDF
by Gutierrez, Federico H.

386 The diversity of household assets holdings in the United States in 2007 and 2009: Measurement and determinants – Download PDF
by Sierminska, Eva M. & Silber, Jacques

385 The Impact of BMI on Mental Health: Further Evidence from Genetic Markers – Download PDF
by Amin, Vikesh & Flores, Carlos A. & Flores-Lagunes, Alfonso

384 Smartphone Use and Academic Performance: Correlation or Causal Relationship? – Download PDF
by Baert, Stijn & Vujić, Sunčica & Amez, Simon & Claeskens, Matteo & Daman, Thomas & Maeckelberghe, Arno & Omey, Eddy & De Marez, Lieven

383 The long-term effect of migration on economic inequality between EU Member States – Download PDF
by Ulceluse, Magdalena

382 Extreme Temperature and Extreme Violence across Age and Gender: Evidence from Russia  Download PDF
by Popova, Olga & Otrachshenko, Vladimir & Tavares, José

381 Income Inequality and the Size of Government: A Causal Analysis – Download PDF
by Guzi, Martin & Kahanec, Martin

380 The Yen Exchange Rate and the Hollowing Out of the Japanese Industry – Download PDF
by Belke, Ansgar & Volz, Ulrich

379 The effectiveness of restrictive immigration policies: the case of transitional arrangements  Download PDF
by Ulceluse, Magdalena & Kahanec, Martin

378 Foreign aid, bilateral asylum immigration and development – Download PDF
by Murat, Marina

377 Interest Rate Hysteresis in Macroeconomic Investment under Uncertainty – Download PDF
by Belke, Ansgar & Göcke, Matthias

376 Skill Gap, Mismatch, and the Dynamics of Italian Companies’ Productivity  Download PDF
by Fanti, Lucrezia & Guarascio, Dario & Tubiana, Matteo

375 Migration. Comparing political and cultural visions – Download PDF
by Bruni, Michele & Catani, Mario

374 Interest Rate Bands of Inaction and Play-Hysteresis in Domestic Investment – Evidence for the Euro Area – Download PDF
by Belke, Ansgar & Frenzel Baudisch, Coletta & Göcke, Matthias

373 Gender division of household labor: How does culture operate?  Download PDF
by Marcén, Miriam & Morales, Marina

372 Labor market policy and subjective well-being during the Great Recession  Download PDF
by Morgan, Robson & O’Connor, Kelsey J.

GLO DP Team
Senior Editors: Matloob Piracha (University of Kent) & GLO; Klaus F. Zimmermann (UNU-MERIT, Maastricht University and Bonn University).
Managing Editor: Magdalena Ulceluse, University of GroningenDP@glabor.org  

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September 10, 2019. Reminder: Submission deadlines approaching for GLO supported conferences.

GLO is affiliated with many events and conferences over the year. For our complete listing see the GLO Events page. New events will be announced on the GLO News page, where you can register to obtain regular email messages.

Close forthcoming deadlines:

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September 9, 2019. New GLO Discussion Paper on ‘Early Childcare & Immigrant Children’s Educational Performance’

A new GLO Discussion Paper finds that the effect of early childcare attendance differs between native and immigrant children. Early childcare seems to be particularly relevant for immigrant children from a disadvantaged background.

The Global Labor Organization (GLO) is an independent, non-partisan and non-governmental organization that functions as an international network and virtual platform to stimulate global research, debate and collaboration.

GLO Discussion Paper No. 394, 2019

Impact of Early Childcare on Immigrant Children’s Educational Performance– Download PDF
by Corazzini, Luca & Meschi, Elena & Pavese, Caterina

GLO Fellow Elena Meschi

Author Abstract: This paper investigates the impact of attending early childcare on second generation immigrant children’s cognitive outcomes. Our analysis draws on administrative data on the entire population of students in fifth grade collected by the Italian Institute for the Evaluation of the Educational System (INVALSI) for school years 2014/2015 to 2016/2017 matched to unique administrative records on the early childcare public available slots at the municipal level. Our identification strategy exploits cross-sectional and time series variation in the provision of early childcare service across Italian municipalities as an instrument for individual early childcare attendance. Our results point out that the effect of early childcare attendance differs between native and immigrant children. Although we find no effects for Italian children, our estimates show a positive and significant effect on literacy test scores for immigrant children of low educated mothers, which suggests that early childcare may be particularly relevant for immigrant children from a disadvantaged background.

GLO Discussion Papers are research and policy papers of the GLO Network which are widely circulated to encourage discussion. Provided in cooperation with EconStor, a service of the ZBW – Leibniz Information Centre for Economics, GLO Discussion Papers are among others listed in RePEc (see IDEAS,  EconPapers)Complete list of all GLO DPs – downloadable for free.

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September 8, 2019. New GLO Discussion Paper on ‘The gender wage gap among PhD holders’

A new GLO Discussion Paper finds for Italy a gender gap of 5% to 8% in hourly wages among PhD holders with sizeable differences by sector of employment and field of specialization.

The Global Labor Organization (GLO) is an independent, non-partisan and non-governmental organization that functions as an international network and virtual platform to stimulate global research, debate and collaboration.

GLO Discussion Paper No. 393, 2019

The gender wage gap among PhD holders: an empirical examination based on Italian data  Download PDF
by Alfano, Vincenzo & Cicatiello, Lorenzo & Gaeta, Giuseppe Lucio & Pinto, Mauro

GLO Fellows Lorenzo Cicatiello, Giuseppe Lucio Gaeta & Sergio Pinto

Author Abstract: A growing number of academic studies are devoting their attention to the study of the gender wage gap. This paper contributes to the literature by analyzing the existence of this gap specifically among those who hold the highest possible educational qualification, i.e. a PhD. The analysis relies on Italian cross-sectional data collected through a highly representative survey of the employment conditions of PhD holders. The econometric analysis is carried out by means of OLS regression, Oaxaca-Blinder decomposition analysis and quantile decomposition. Findings suggest that a gender gap in hourly wages exists among PhD holders, that it lies approximately between 5% and 8%, with sizeable differences by sector of employment and field of specialization, and that such a gap is largely unexplained.

GLO Discussion Papers are research and policy papers of the GLO Network which are widely circulated to encourage discussion. Provided in cooperation with EconStor, a service of the ZBW – Leibniz Information Centre for Economics, GLO Discussion Papers are among others listed in RePEc (see IDEAS,  EconPapers)Complete list of all GLO DPs – downloadable for free.

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September 7, 2019. New GLO Discussion Paper on ‘Family Size and Sibling Structure & the Great Mexico-US Migration’

A new GLO Discussion Paper on the Great Mexico-US migration finds that large families per se do not boost offspring out-migration. The likelihood of migrating is higher for sons and decreases sharply with birth order.

The Global Labor Organization (GLO) is an independent, non-partisan and non-governmental organization that functions as an international network and virtual platform to stimulate global research, debate and collaboration.

GLO Discussion Paper No. 392, 2019

The Impact of Family Size and Sibling Structure on the Great Mexico-U.S. Migration – Download PDF
by Bratti, Massimiliano & Fiore, Simona & Mendola, Mariapia

GLO Fellows Massimiliano Bratti & Mariapia Mendola and GLO Affiliate Simona Fiore

Author Abstract: We investigate how fertility and demographic factors affect migration at the household level by assessing the causal effects of sibship size and structure on offspring’s international migration. We use a rich demographic survey on the population of Mexico and exploit presumably exogenous variation in family size induced by biological fertility and infertility shocks. We further exploit cross-sibling differences to identify birth order, sibling-sex, and sibling-age composition effects on migration. We find that large families per se do not boost offspring out-migration. Yet, the likelihood of migrating is not equally distributed within a household, but is higher for sons and decreases sharply with birth order. The female migration disadvantage also varies with sibling composition by age and gender.

GLO Discussion Papers are research and policy papers of the GLO Network which are widely circulated to encourage discussion. Provided in cooperation with EconStor, a service of the ZBW – Leibniz Information Centre for Economics, GLO Discussion Papers are among others listed in RePEc (see IDEAS,  EconPapers)Complete list of all GLO DPs – downloadable for free.

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September 7, 2019. Call for contributions for the ‘Australian Gender Economics Workshop’, 5-7 February 2020. Submission deadline is 13 September 2019!

  • The third edition of the Australian Gender Economics Workshop (AGEW) will take place in Brisbane at the Queensland University of Technology on 5-7 February 2020.
  • The aim of AGEW is to foster a community of economic researchers who can collectively contribute to the evidence base needed to guide the pursuit of more gender equitable outcomes in society.
  • Submissions of both applied and theoretical work on any topic of gender economics are invited.
  • Victor Lavy and GLO Fellows Shoshana Grossbard & Gigi Foster are the keynote speakers.
  • GLO Fellows Tina Rampino (Chair) & Rigissa Megalokonomou are among the members of the AGEW2020 Organizing Committee.
  • Full papers or extended abstracts (min. 1500 words)
  • Submission deadline is 13 September 2019!
  • MORE DETAILS & FULL CALL.

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September 6, 2019. Turkish University Students’ Self-Perceptions of Aging. New Research from the GLO Network.

A new GLO Discussion Paper finds that almost 85 percent of “engineering” and “economics and administrative science” faculty students describe health and elderly care as the two major concerns they have for their old ages.

The Global Labor Organization (GLO) is an independent, non-partisan and non-governmental organization that functions as an international network and virtual platform to stimulate global research, debate and collaboration.

GLO Discussion Paper No. 391, 2019

Turkish University Students’ Self-Perceptions of Aging: An Analysis Over Socio-Economic Dimensions – Download PDF
by Yumurtaci, Aynur & Bagis, Bilal

GLO Fellow Bilal Bagis

Author Abstract: University students represent nearly more than half of the youth population (age group of 15-24) in Turkey. Meanwhile, the latest demographic data shows that they will constitute a majority of the elder generation in the context of the recent rapid aging trend in the near future. That said, and although the number of studies related to the students’ perceptions of old ages are increasing in recent years, there is still room to extend our understanding of the influence of demographics, social and economic patterns on students’ self perceptions of old age. To investigate the Turkish students’ views towards their own 65+ ages, a questionary is applied to 450 students from two different universities located in different regions in Turkey. Survey analysis shows that, almost 85 percent of “engineering” and “economics and administrative science” faculty students describe health and elderly care as the two major concerns in their old ages. On the contrary, answers of the two faculties differentiated clearly in terms of happiness, ability to save more and living with someone else in their old ages. Also, students accept retirement period as a reflection of aging and most of the students claim they had never thought about the aging process before. Yet, female and male students describe the meaning of retirement as the most comfortable period and a period that makes no sense, respectively.

GLO Discussion Papers are research and policy papers of the GLO Network which are widely circulated to encourage discussion. Provided in cooperation with EconStor, a service of the ZBW – Leibniz Information Centre for Economics, GLO Discussion Papers are among others listed in RePEc (see IDEAS,  EconPapers)Complete list of all GLO DPs – downloadable for free.

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September 6, 2019. ‘Decomposing the gender pay gap in the USA’: Now published online in the Journal of Population Economics.

Gender pay gaps are still of much concern, in particular in the United States. A new GLO Discussion Paper adds to our understanding how the gender gap is shaped by multiple different forces such as parenthood, gender segregation, part-time work and unionization.

Read more in:

Katie Meara, Francesco Pastore & Allan Webster
The gender pay gap in the USA: a matching study
Journal of Population Economics, now FREE PAPER PDF

GLO Fellows Francesco Pastore & Allan Webster
The paper is also GLO Discussion Paper No. 363, 2019.

Author Abstract: This study examines the gender wage gap in the USA using two separate cross-sections from the Current Population Survey (CPS). The extensive literature on this subject includes wage decompositions that divide the gender wage gap into “explained” and “unexplained” components. One of the problems with this approach is the heterogeneity of the sample data. In order to address the difficulties of comparing like with like, this study uses a number of different matching techniques to obtain estimates of the gap. By controlling for a wide range of other influences, in effect, we estimate the direct effect of simply being female on wages. However, a number of other factors, such as parenthood, gender segregation, part-time working, and unionization, contribute to the gender wage gap. This means that it is not just the core “like for like” comparison between male and female wages that matters but also how gender wage differences interact with other influences. The literature has noted the existence of these interactions, but precise or systematic estimates of such effects remain scarce. The most innovative contribution of this study is to do that. Our findings imply that the idea of a single uniform gender pay gap is perhaps less useful than an understanding of how gender wages are shaped by multiple different forces.

Read also the Lead Article of issue 4 (2019):
Gautam Hazarika, Chandan Kumar & Sudipta Sarangi:
Ancestral ecological endowments and missing women
Journal of Population Economics, Vol. 32 (2019), Issue 4 (October), pp. 1101-1123
Journal Website, complete issue 4. Paper PDF – OPEN ACCESS.
GLO Fellows Gautam Hazarika, Chandan Kumar Jha & Sudipta Sarangi

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