European Labour Mobility after Brexit

ON DECEMBER 2, 2017 at BRUEGEL/BRUSSELS

What does Brexit mean for the free movement of workers between the UK and the EU?

Discussion meeting with Lindsey Barras (Director at PricewaterhouseCoopers Legal), Jonathan Portes (Principal Research Fellow, National Institute of Economic and Social Research) and Klaus F. Zimmermann (Princeton University and UNU-MERIT).

Immigration was a major factor – if not the major factor – in the UK’s vote to leave the EU. The UK government is promising to take a tough stance on immigration in the negotiations. Meanwhile EU leaders are signalling that freedom of movement is non-negotiable and four central European countries are threatening to block any trade deal with the UK that would restrict the rights of their workers to live and work in the EU.

MORE INFORMATION  and the VIDEO of the event at Bruegel.

Zimmermann at Bruegel on December 2, 2016.

img_20161202_040322

ENDS;

Posted in Media, Policy | Comments Off on European Labour Mobility after Brexit

Migration for development: Policy debate in Bonn

Watch the live stream on December 5, 2016 starting 8:50 am. European Development Conference 2016 on “Migration and Development” organized by the European Development Network and the Center for Development Research (ZEF), Bonn University. The event takes place in the University Club Bonn.

Klaus F. Zimmermann, currently Princeton University and Co-Director of POP at UNU-MERIT, Maastricht, is also a Senior Fellow of Center for Development Research (ZEF), Bonn University. He was recently Visiting Scholar at Harvard University and is on leave from the Economics Department of Bonn University.

Zimmermann delivers the opening keynote lecture on “Migration for Development: Opportunities and Challenges“. His speech will deal with

Opportunities and risks of forced and free migration for developing countries.

How policies in receiving countries can enhance the positive impact of migration for development.

Program

9:00-9:30 Conference Opening
Annette Chammas (BMZ) German Ministry of Economic Cooperation and Development, Stephan Klasen, President, European Development Research Network, Joachim von Braun, ZEF

9:30-10:30 Overview lecture: Migration for Development: Opportunities and Challenges
Klaus F. Zimmermann (Visiting Professor, Princeton University and Senior Fellow of Center for Development Research (ZEF), Bonn University), lecture

11:00-12:30 Panel 1: The development impact of migration for sending countries
Hillel Rapoport (Paris School of Economics), lecture
Toman Barsbai (Kiel Institute), discussant
Marta Foresti (ODI), discussant
Anda David (French Development Agency), discussant

13:30-15:00 Panel 2: How to improve the migration process
Dean Yang (University of Michigan), lecture
Melissa Siegel (Maastricht, tbc), discussant

15:30-17:00 Panel 3: How to promote integration of migrants
Tommaso Frattini (University of Milan), lecture
Sara de la Rica (Pais Vasco, tbc)
Axel Kreienbrink (BAMF), discussant

17:00-18:30 Policy Panel: Migration policies for development

 

Zimmermann back in the University Club, Bonn University

254_20160222-LP4_7489_4000px

ENDS;

Posted in Media, Policy, Science | Comments Off on Migration for development: Policy debate in Bonn

Zimmermann sprach in der Universität Wien

Im Rahmen  der Vorlesungsreihe “Migration und Ökonomie” der Studienvertretung Volkswirtschaftslehre an der Universität Wien in diesem Wintersemester sprach Klaus F. Zimmermann am vergangenen Montagabend, dem 28. 11. 2016, im Rahmen eines Skype-Vortrages zum Thema

Migrationspolitik und Flüchtlingskrise

Wichtige Thesen seines Vortrags waren

  • Zuwanderung wirkt generell positiv auf die Wirtschaft.
  • Mobile und offene Arbeitsmärkte schaffen Wohlstand.
  • Die gegenwärtigen Flüchtlingsströme werden die europäischen Arbeitsmärkte kaum beeinflussen.
  • Die Flüchtlingsfrage ist ein politisches Thema, das nur im europäischen Kontext gelöst werden kann.
  • Europa und seine Staaten brauchen klare  Zuwanderungsregeln , die auch den frühen Arbeitsmarktzugang  von Flüchtlingen erfassen.

Klaus F. Zimmermann, Princeton University und UNU-MERIT, Maastricht, sprach damit 2016 zum wiederholten Male, nun vor Studenten der Universität Wien. Zuvor war er u.a. im Oktober Gastredner bei einer Veranstaltung der Volkswirtschaftlichen Fakultät der Wirtschaftsuniversität Wien und bei einer öffentlichen Veranstaltung im Weis<s>en Salon in Wien (s.a. Link zu Videoaufzeichnung dort).

Klaus F. Zimmermann in der Wirtschaftsuniversität Wien

img_20161012_122914

ENDS;

Posted in Policy | Comments Off on Zimmermann sprach in der Universität Wien

The Benefits of Open Societies

Comment by Klaus F. Zimmermann (Princeton University and UNU-MERIT)

Up until recently, many Europeans have seen images of large refugee camps and desperate families trying to cross borders only on TV screens. The unprecedented influx of refugees into Europe over the last two years, the largest since World War II,  has  rendered refugee scenes into a reality in many European neighborhoods. Feelings of empathy and shock were increasingly joined by worries about the consequences the refugee crisis will have on society, welfare institutions and labor markets. In practically all EU member-states these worries primarily drove public opinion and political action, causing temporary closings of Schengen borders and resistance against a fair allocation of refugees across Europe.

The refugee crisis soon became a political crisis that gave rise to populist parties. The topic was more and more mixed up with other migration issues, economic or educational migration, welfare migration and even internal EU labor mobility. Brexit, the surprising vote of the British to move out of the European Union was another unforeseen act fueled by mis-communicated migration concerns. The migration topic suddenly is determining elections in member-states and causing large disagreements about possible European approaches to solve the crisis. Hence, the migration issue acts like a catalyst in an endgame of the European Union, although it is only misused in the face of weak political structures. The current crisis can be seen as a crisis of Europe and its institutions, and not one of European migration. Refugees and internal labor mobility have not been the cause of the crisis, although for some in the political arena it is a most welcome byproduct.

To the contrary, substantial scientific evidence suggests that most of the current worries in Europe about migration are unfounded. Various empirical studies point to the economic opportunities of migration in general, which typically leads to more welfare, employment and better wages. Migrants move for work, not to reap the European welfare state. In most cases they do not take the jobs of natives nor do they depress wages. EU enlargement including the inclusion of Romania has been a showcase for a successful European policy that is largely undervalued and misunderstood. Shrinking and aging European populations and a much too low internal labor mobility suggests the need to foster stronger internal migration and to attract people from outside Europe in the future.  Migrants from outside the EU are typically more mobile and they play also a significant role in the internal EU mobility. Workers in Euro-zone countries have become more mobile than those from countries not in this zone. Nonetheless, internal mobility in the EU is far below what can be achieved.

There are undoubtedly challenges to deal with the previously unexpected refugees flows. Not enough capacities are available to deal with the migrants in major affected states, mainly Greece, Italy, Austria, Germany and Sweden. And several, in particular East European member states of the EU still refuse to take their share in a fair and effective allocation of migrants that preserves European principles and European unity. This is unwise, because Europe should take the chance to create, improve and stabilize national and European institutions for the likely challenges to come in the future and strengthen its unity. Since the borders in the South of Europe cannot be effectively controlled forever, this is the better political strategy.

The debate should keep in mind: Labor mobility contributes to an optimal allocation of resources, and therefore generates higher and better output and more welfare. It supports a fast adjustment of labor markets in particular after asymmetric regional shocks, and hence reduces unemployment. European visionary leaders have been pushing for a long time to complete the Single European Labor Market, which is still incomplete. The more open and transparent the borders for work are (EU internally or from outside), the more likely is that the inflow stagnates and immigration is followed by emigration, if workers are no longer needed. Migration is a process, not a stationary solution. This is also beneficial for countries like Romania, which currently has to deal with a large outflow of its population.

Invited by the Editor during a recent trip to Bucharest/Romania, this comment was just published as “The Benefits of Open Societies” in the Romania-based magazine BUSINESS-VIP, Vol. XXI, Fall Edition 2016.  comment-published

Further references:

Zimmermann, Klaus F., Refugee and Migrant Labor Market Integration: Europe in Need of a New Policy Agenda. Mimeo. Presented at the EUI Conference on the Integration of Migrants and Refugees, 29-30 September 2016 in Florence.

Constant, Amelie F. & Klaus F. Zimmermann, Towards a New European Refugee Policy that Works. Forthcoming 2016: CESifo DICE Report – Journal of International Comparisons. (With A. F. Constant.) UNU – MERIT Working Paper # 2016-062

Kahanec, M. and Zimmermann, K.F. (2016) Labor Migration, EU Enlargement, and the Great Recession. Springer-Verlag, Berlin.

Klaus F. Zimmermann (Princeton University and UNU-MERIT) visiting Harvard University

img_20161112_105523

ENDS;

Posted in Policy | Comments Off on The Benefits of Open Societies

Labor Mobility after Brexit

ON DECEMBER 2, 2017 at BRUEGEL/BRUSSELS

What will Brexit mean for the free movement of workers between the UK and the EU?

This will be discussed by Lindsey Barras (Director at PricewaterhouseCoopers Legal), Jonathan Portes (Principal Research Fellow, National Institute of Economic and Social Research) and Klaus F. Zimmermann (Princeton University and UNU-MERIT).

Immigration was a major factor – if not the major factor – in the UK’s vote to leave the EU. The UK government is promising to take a tough stance on immigration in the negotiations. Meanwhile EU leaders are signalling that freedom of movement is non-negotiable and four central European countries are threatening to block any trade deal with the UK that would restrict the rights of their workers to live and work in the EU.

MORE INFORMATION  about the event at Bruegel.

Brexit symbolizes the new worries about internal European mobility. At the same time, the additional fears generated by the refugee crisis crowds out the necessary debate about new labor migration to Europe. Against this background, Martin Kahanec and Klaus F. Zimmermann have presented their book on EU enlargement and the labor markets in Europe dealing with these issues. The lessons drawn rely on the research work of a multi-country project team providing empirical evidence on European migration in the Great Recession and afterwards for many countries, in particular the UK.

Klaus F. Zimmermann in Brussels

img_20160519_080429

ENDS;

Posted in Media, Policy | Comments Off on Labor Mobility after Brexit

Book Presentation Budapest

Brexit symbolizes the new worries about internal European mobility. At the same time, the additional fears generated by the refugee crisis crowds out the necessary debate about new labor migration to Europe. Against this background, Martin Kahanec and Klaus F. Zimmermann launch their new book on October 6, 2016 in Budapest dealing with these issues. The lessons drawn rely on the research work of a multi-country project team providing empirical evidence on European migration in the Great Recession and afterwards for many countries.

Book Launch: see details. The event is open to the public.

Ends;

Posted in Uncategorized | Comments Off on Book Presentation Budapest

Prominent Scientists on 30 Years of the Journal of Population Economics

Views of prominent scientists (see below) on the 30th Anniversary of the Journal of Population Economics are contained in the first issue 2017, now in print and already available online. All articles are available free of charge until December 15, 2016.

International Research on the Economics of Population, Household, and Human Resources

Editor-in-Chief: Klaus F. Zimmermann; Editors: A. Cigno; E. Tekin; J.S. Zhang; Managing Editor: Alessio J.G. Brown

Journal of Population Economics

Throughout the decades, the Journal of Population Economics has been at the forefront of population economics research and has strongly established itself as the leading outlet in the field of population economics. Many views on the Journal by Nobel Laureates and leading academics from economics, history, sociology, political science and demography included on the occasion of the Journal’s 30th anniversary in the editorial of issue 01/2017 bear testament to this:

 

heckman“I read each issue”

I congratulate the Journal of Population Economics on the advent of its 30th year of publication. Its founder and chief editor-Klaus Zimmermann – and his editorial boards – have done an outstanding job in creating a high quality forum for research on the economics of the household, migration, fertility, education and health. I read each issue with interest and have learned much from it over the years. I wish it continued success.

James J. Heckman, Henry Schultz Distinguished Service Professor of Economics at the University of Chicago, Nobel Prize Winner in Economics

 

pissarideswill become more important than ever”

The core of every economy is its population and a dedicated journal was long overdue when the Journal of Population Economics was launched. With our stagnant populations, ageing and immigration the topics on which it focuses will become more important than ever. As it turns 30 it promises to occupy an ever-important place in the profession and we should all be thankful for its existence.

Sir Christopher Pissarides, Regius Professor of Economics at the London School of Economics, Nobel Prize Winner in Economics

 

biopic“one of the most important journals of economics”

The Journal of Population Economics straddles an important space between demography and formal economics that, while always important, had been neglected before the journal came into existence. In the thirty years since its inception the journal has seen a most remarkable climb to prominence. It witnessed a steady rise in impact factor over the last decade and has established itself as one of the most important journals of economics.

Kaushik Basu, Chief Economist and Senior Vice President at the World Bank, Professor of Economics and C. Marks Professor at Cornell University.

 

jcurrie_new_2015-photo-credit-denise-applewhite“a must read”

The Journal of Population Economics had become the go to place for research at the intersection of economics and demography. In a world where issues such as aging populations and migration demand policy responses, the journal has become a must read.

Janet Currie, Henry Putnam Professor of Economics and Public Affairs and Director of the Center for Health and Well-Being at Princeton University

photo credit Denise Applewhite

 

francesconilook forward to the next 30 years”

In the last 30 years, the Journal of Population Economics has published influential research in many salient realms of economic life worldwide, from migration problems to gender issues, from intergenerational matters to public policies, and from inequality and poverty to health, education and economic growth.

 In a world characterized by increasing political and economic uncertainty, greater flows of people around the globe, climate change and an explosion of data availability, the Journal is likely to continue to attract and publish high quality research from the expanding army of applied social scientists in all areas of population economics.

We all look forward to the next 30 years of publications in the Journal of Population Economics!

Marco Francesconi, Professor of Economics at the University of Essex, UK, and ESPE President 2017

 

gregoryan exceptional flagship for population economics”

In somewhat typical style 29 years ago, Klaus Zimmermann, Editor-in-Chief, expressed the following ambitions for Population Economics – the new journal should cover all aspects of the fascinating, new and promising field. The journal should be international with a high reputation. The first issue should be perfectly balanced – it was not, of course, insufficient empirical work for his taste! But the promises have been truly kept. The latest issue includes empirical articles based on data from America, France, Netherlands, China, Africa, Sweden and Canada. The journal is an exceptional flagship for population economics.

Bob Gregory, Emeritus Professor of the Research School of Economics at the Australian National University

 

james_hollifieldgreat insights for scholars and policymakers”

The areas covered by the Journal of Population Economics, everything from demographic change to migration and human capital, are vital issues for national and international development in the 21st century. For thirty years the Journal of Population Economics has published cutting-edge research in the field providing great insights for scholars and policymakers alike. Happy birthday Journal of Population Economics and congratulations to Klaus Zimmermann and the entire editorial team!

James F. Hollifield, Professor of International Political Economy and Director of the Tower Center for Political Studies at the Southern Methodist University, USA

 

SAMSUNG CSC

SAMSUNG CSC

a global forum for the rigorous exchange on scientific ideas”

It is a pleasure to congratulate the Journal of Population Economics — and its editors, authors, and reviewers – on the journal’s 30th anniversary.   With every passing year, the Journal of Population Economics becomes more fully a global forum for the rigorous exchange of scientific ideas on population dynamics, stretching from a core of economic principles to join sibling disciplines in producing new theoretical and empirical knowledge.

Guillermina Jasso, Silver Professor and Professor of Sociology at New York University, USA

 

rlee_2014b“Its reputation and success have surged”

The Journal of Population Economics has long provided a great home for articles on population economics, and a forum for discussion of the many important scientific and policy issues involving demography. Its reputation and success have surged. Happy 30th Birthday, J Popul Econ!

Ronald Lee, Edward G. and Nancy S. Jordan Family Professor Emeritus of Economics, Professor Emeritus of Demography and Associate Director, Center for the Economics and Demography of Aging (CEDA) at University of California, Berkeley, USA

 

neumark“leading journal of economic demography”

The Journal of Population Economics has established itself as the leading journal of economic demography, covering a range of related topics in migration/immigration, development, and the economics of the family. If fills an important niche between the standard labor economics journals and the interdisciplinary demography journals. 

David Neumark, Chancellor’s Professor of Economics and Director, Economic Self-Sufficiency Policy Research Institute (ESSPRI) at the University of California, Irvine, USA

 

smith“took a vacant position among economics journals”

The Journal of Population Economics took a vacant position among economics journals when it started in 1987 as a high quality journal in areas like migration, family economics, human capital and education. These fields have become extremely important for economic growth and development today, 30 years later. Congratulations to the farsighted and successful founders of Journal of Population Economics and especially the pioneer Klaus Zimmermann. Best wishes for the next 30 years of great volumes from JOPE!

Nina Smith, Professor of Economics at Aarhus University

 

zengleading outlet for academic research on economic and demographic problems”

Congratulations for the 30th anniversary of the Journal of Population Economics! It has been a leading outlet for academic research on economic and demographic problems for the past 30 years and I am sure it will continue to be so.

Xiangquan Zeng, Professor of Economics and Director of the China Institute for Employment Research (CIER) at Renmin University of China

 

ENDS;

Posted in Economics, Research output, Science | Comments Off on Prominent Scientists on 30 Years of the Journal of Population Economics

Meeting of the Society of Economics of the Household 2017

San Diego State University, San Diego, California on June 25-26, 2017

The first meeting of the Society of Household Economics will be held in San Diego on Sunday June 25 and Monday June 26 2017. There will be parallel sessions and plenary sessions featuring Barry R. Chiswick, Daniela Del Boca, Michael Grossman, Charles Horioka and Klaus F. Zimmermann.

You may submit an extended abstract (max 1000 words) for consideration by Wednesday, February 15, 2017here .

Authors of accepted abstracts will be notified by 15 March 2017. The full paper submission and registration deadline is 15 April 2017.

The keynote speech of Klaus F. Zimmermann (Princeton University and Co-Director of POP at UNU-MERIT) is scheduled to be: “The Economics of Multitasking“. Alessio J.G. Brown (Co-Director of POP at UNU-MERIT) acts as a member of the Program Committee of the conference.

More information on the keynote speakers and on logistics can be obtained at http://economics.sdsu.edu/seho/.

*******************************

Klaus F. Zimmermann and Alessio J. G. Brown (right) in front of UNU-MERIT

img_20161125_055838

ENDS;

Posted in Events | Comments Off on Meeting of the Society of Economics of the Household 2017

Klaus F. Zimmermann – New Research in 2016

RESEARCH PAPERS  2016 (21).

Klaus F. Zimmermann (Princeton University and UNU-MERIT) has published or prepared 21 research papers in 2016. Titles and links:

Zimmermann, Klaus F., Refugee and Migrant Labor Market Integration: Europe in Need of a New Policy Agenda. Mimeo. Presented at the EUI Conference on the Integration of Migrants and Refugees, 29-30 September 2016 in Florence.

Constant, Amelie F. & Klaus F. Zimmermann, Towards a New European Refugee Policy that Works. Forthcoming 2016: CESifo DICE Report – Journal of International Comparisons. (With A. F. Constant.) UNU – MERIT Working Paper # 2016-062

Cervellati, Matteo, Uwe Sunde & Klaus F. Zimmermann, Demographic Dynamics and Long-Run Development: Insights for the Secular Stagnation Debate, Working Paper #604, Princeton University, Industrial Relations Section, UNU – MERIT Working Paper # 2016-049, ZEF Discussion Papers on Development Policy #226 & CEPR Discussion Paper DP 11569. Forthcoming 2017: Journal of Population Economics.

Constant, Amelie F., Annabelle Krause, Ulf Rinne & Klaus. F. Zimmermann, Reservation Wages of First- and Second -Generation Migrants, forthcoming 2017: Applied Economics Letters. UNU – MERIT Working Paper # 2016-050

Brown, Alessio J.G. & Klaus F. Zimmermann, Three Decades of Publishing Research in Population Economics: Journal of Population Economics, 30 (2017), 11-27.

Zimmermann, Klaus F., Pionier der Medienökonomik, in: Jörg Müller-Lietzkow & Felix Sattelberger (Eds.), Empirische Medienökonomie. Reflexionen der Arbeiten von Wolfgang Seufert, Nomos-Verlag, 2016, 52-56.

Zimmermann, Klaus F., Migrationspolitik im Mediensturm (Migration Policy in the Media Storm), Wirtschaftspolitische Blätter, 63 (2016), 497-508.

Zaiceva, Anzelika & Klaus F. Zimmermann, Migration and the Demographic Shift, forthcoming 2016 in: J. Piggott and A. Woodland (Eds.), Handbook of the Economics of Population Aging, North Holland, Vol. A.

Constant, Amelie F. & Klaus F. Zimmermann, Diaspora Economics: New Perspectives International Journal of Manpower, 37 (2016), No. 7, 1110-1135.

Mbaye, Linguère Mously & Klaus F. Zimmermann, 2016, Natural Disasters and Human Mobility, UNU-MERIT Working Paper 2016-040ZEF Working Paper 151 . Forthcoming: International Review of Environmental and Resource Economics, 10 (2016), 1-20. DOI 10.1561/101.00000082

Akay, Alpaslan, Olivier Bargain & Klaus F. Zimmermann, 2016, Home Sweet Home?  Macroeconomic Conditions in Home Countries and the Well-Being of Migrants, UNU-MERIT Working Paper 2016-038                                                                                Forthcoming: Journal of Human Resources

Chowdhury, Shamal, Annabelle Krause & Klaus F. Zimmermann, 2016,                              Arsenic Contamination of Drinking Water and Mental Health,                                      Working Paper #607, Princeton University, Industrial Relations Section                                  UNU-MERIT Working Paper 2016-037;                                                                                             ZEF -Discussion Papers on Development Policy, No.222

Ritzen, Jo & Klaus F. Zimmermann, 2016, Fading Hope and the Rise in Inequality in the United States, UNU-MERIT Working Paper 2016-025

Zimmermann, Klaus F., Health Shocks and Well-Being. Forthcoming 2016                       Indian Journal of Labour Economics, DOI 10.1007/s41027-016-0045-0

Nikolova, Milena, Monica Roman & Klaus F. Zimmermann. Left Behind but Doing Good? Civic Engagement in Two Post-Socialist Countries. Forthcoming, online 2016.                       Journal of Comparative Economics. http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jce.2016.04.006

Akgüc, Mehtap, Xingfei Liu, Max Tani & Klaus F. Zimmermann, Risk Attitudes and Migration, China Economic Review, 37 (2016), 166-176.

Akay, Alpaslan, Olivier Bargain, Corrado Guilietti, Juan D. Robalino & Klaus F. Zimmermann, Remittances and Relative Concerns in Rural China,                                          China Economic Review, 37 (2016), 191-207.

Ritzen, Jo, Caroline Wehner & Klaus F. Zimmermann,                                                 Euroskepticism, Income Inequality and Financial Expectations,                                                  B.E. Journal of Economic Analysis and Policy, 16 (2016), 539-576.

Rinne, Ulf & Klaus F. Zimmermann: Die digitale Arbeitswelt von heute und morgen, Aus Politik und Zeitgeschichte (APuZ), 66. Jahrgang, 18-19, 2. Mai 2016, 3 – 9.

Hinte, Holger, Ulf Rinne & Klaus F. Zimmermann, Punkte machen?! Warum Deutschland ein aktives Auswahlsystem für ausländische Fachkräfte braucht und wie ein solches System aussehen kann, Perspektiven der Wirtschaftspolitik, 17 (2016), 68-87.

Krause, Annabelle, Ulf Rinne & Klaus F. Zimmermann, How Far are We from a Single European Labour Market?, International Journal of Manpower. Forthcoming 2017.

**************************************************************************

Klaus F. Zimmermann in front of UNU-MERIT, Maastricht, where he directs POP.  POP is a Centre for Population, Development and Labour Economics, which joined UNU-MERIT and its School of Governance in Maastricht in 2016 as an independent economics research group.

img_20161125_025838

Ends;

Posted in Research output | Comments Off on Klaus F. Zimmermann – New Research in 2016

POP Team attends Migration workshop in Maastricht

POP at UNU-MERIT Co-Directors Alessio J. G. Brown and Klaus F. Zimmermann (also Princeton University) were attending events organized by the Maastricht Graduate School of Governance in Maastricht. Both participated in a Ph. D. defense ceremony, Alessio Brown as a member of the degree committee, and Klaus F. Zimmermann as an opposition member. They further engaged in a two-days migration workshop with doctoral students. The events took place at Maastricht University and UNU-MERIT.

Klaus F. Zimmermann and Alessio J. G. Brown (right) in front of UNU-MERIT

img_20161125_055838

 

Klaus F. Zimmermann in front of UNU-MERIT

img_20161125_025838

Ends;

Posted in Policy, Science | Comments Off on POP Team attends Migration workshop in Maastricht