Research Article in the Journal of Population Economics: Names and Behavior in the Croatian War.

In GLO Discussion Paper No. 450, GLO Fellows Stepan Jurajda and Dejan Kovač have recently provided research evidence revealing that given first names of leaders from World War II can predict behavior in the 1991-1995 Croatian war of independence and beyond in society including voting. It provides hard evidence for intergenerational transmission of nationalism. This research work has found already much interest in the scientific community and beyond. It is now published online first in the Journal of Population Economics (see details and access link below). Recently, the authors were interviewed by GLO about the background and context of this research.

Stepan Jurajda & Dejan Kovač: Names and Behavior in a War, GLO Discussion Paper 450, 2020. Online First: Journal of Population Economics.
Click to read: READLINK!

Abstract

We implement a novel empirical strategy for measuring and studying a strong form of nationalism—the willingness to fight and die in a war for national independence—using name choices corresponding to a previous war leader. Based on data on almost half a million soldiers, we first show that having been given a first name that is synonymous with the leader(s) of the Croatian state during World War II predicts volunteering for service in the 1991–1995 Croatian war of independence and dying during the conflict. Next, we use the universe of Croatian birth certificates and the information about nationalism conveyed by first names to suggests that in ex-Yugoslav Croatia, nationalism rose continuously starting in the 1970s and that its rise was curbed in areas where concentration camps were located during WWII. Our evidence on intergenerational transmission of nationalism is consistent with nationalist fathers purposefully reflecting the trade-off between within-family and society-wide transmission channels of political values. We also link the nationalist values we proxy using first name choices to right-wing voting behavior in 2015, 20 years after the war.

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Imperfect Mobility

A new GLO Discussion Paper uses a Markov chain to model the spatial dynamics of the population distribution for microdata from the American Community Survey.

The Global Labor Organization (GLO) is an independent, non-partisan and non-governmental organization that functions as an international network and virtual platform to stimulate global research, debate and collaboration.

GLO Discussion Paper No. 623, 2020

Imperfect MobilityDownload PDF
by
Cai, Zhengyu

GLO Fellow Zhengyu Cai

Author Abstract: This study investigates why the strong form of the spatial equilibrium is weakly supported in the literature. Using a discrete choice model, it shows that the strong form of the spatial equilibrium is rarely observed because workers are imperfectly mobile from the perspective of researchers. Incorporating the discrete choice model, a Markov chain is used to model the spatial dynamics of the population distribution. For a given location choice set, the population distribution is shown to converge to a unique spatial steady state. Microdata from the American Community Survey show that the model assumption is reasonable and support the model predictions.

GLO Discussion Papers are research and policy papers of the GLO Network which are widely circulated to encourage discussion. Provided in cooperation with EconStor, a service of the ZBW – Leibniz Information Centre for Economics, GLO Discussion Papers are among others listed in RePEc (see IDEAS,  EconPapers)Complete list of all GLO DPs – downloadable for free.

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The Political Economy of Populism

The GLO Virtual Seminar is a monthly internal GLO research event chaired by GLO Director Matloob Piracha and hosted by the GLO partner institution University of Kent. The results are available on the GLO website and the GLO News section, where also the video of the presentation is posted. All GLO related videos are also available in the GLO YouTube channel. (To subscribe go there.)

The last seminar was given by Sergei Guriev on The Political Economy of Populism. Below find a report, the video of the seminar and the background paper.

Announcement/forthcoming seminar:
September 3, 2020: London/UK at 1-2 pm Kompal Sinha, Macquarie University and GLO
Topic: To be announced.
Registration details will be provided in time.

GLO Director Matloob Piracha

Report

The Political Economy of Populism

GLO Virtual Seminar on August 6, 2020 with Sergei Guriev (Sciences Po & GLO). Video !!!

Related paper: Sergei Guriev and Elias Papaioannou,
The Political Economy of Populism. PDF
Draft prepared for the Journal of Economic Literature.

GLO President Klaus F. Zimmermann following the lecture of Sergei Guriev from his homeoffice.

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The labor market for native and international PhD students.

A new GLO Discussion Paper studies the Australian labor market for native and foreign students and finds that acquiring education in the host country does not appear to eliminate uneven labor market outcomes between natives and foreigners.

The Global Labor Organization (GLO) is an independent, non-partisan and non-governmental organization that functions as an international network and virtual platform to stimulate global research, debate and collaboration.

GLO Discussion Paper No. 621, 2020

The labour market for native and international PhD students: similarities, differences, and the role of (university) employers Download PDF
by
Tani, Massimiliano

GLO Fellow Max Tani

Author Abstract: This paper studies the labor market outcomes of native and foreign PhD graduates staying as migrants in Australia, using data on career destinations over the period 1999-2015. Natives with an English-speaking background emerge as benefiting from positive employer discrimination, especially if graduating in Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics (STEM), for which they receive a premium that is unrelated to observed characteristics such as gender, age, and previous work experience. In contrast, foreign PhD graduates with a non-English speaking background experience worse labor market outcomes, especially if they work in the university sector. Acquiring education in the host country does not appear to eliminate uneven labor market outcomes between natives and foreigners.

GLO Discussion Papers are research and policy papers of the GLO Network which are widely circulated to encourage discussion. Provided in cooperation with EconStor, a service of the ZBW – Leibniz Information Centre for Economics, GLO Discussion Papers are among others listed in RePEc (see IDEAS,  EconPapers)Complete list of all GLO DPs – downloadable for free.

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32nd EBES Conference Istanbul, August 5-7, 2020: Highlights

The 32nd EBES (Eurasia Business and Economics Society) Conference in Istanbul took place on August 5-7, 2020. Due to the Coronacrisis, it took place virtually. Final program.

EBES and GLO are partner organizations. GLO President Klaus F. Zimmermann is also President of EBES. Among the highlights were the sessions below with GLO Fellows Mehmet Huseyin Bilgin, Jonathan Batten, Marco Vivarelli and Dorothea Schäfer. Asli Demirguc-Kunt (World Bank) spoke on the occasion of her appointment as EBES Fellow 2020. Klaus F. Zimmermann congratulated her to this honor and closed the appointment session.

From the left: Batten, Bilgin, Schäfer, Vivarelli, Zimmermann

In his opening speech, EBES President Klaus F. Zimmermann was using his recent joint paper in The World Economy with EBES colleagues to introduce the inter-country transmission challenge of the Covid-19 pandemic and outlined the consequences for academic networking and conferencing. He was calling for attempts to introduce social components into virtual conferences.

Klaus F. Zimmermann, Gokhan Karabulut, Mehmet Huseyin Bilgin and Asli Cansin Doker  (2020), “Inter-country Distancing, Globalization and the Coronavirus Pandemic“, The World Economy, 43,1484-1498. OPEN ACCESS

The Keynote Panel on How Covid-19 can help us build a better society? was chaired and guided by Jonathan Batten. Klaus F. Zimmermann spoke on human resources issues, Marco Vivarelli an the labor market and Dorothea Schäfer on financial markets.

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BACKGROUND PAPER mentioned by Zimmermann as an example in his panel contribution.
UNU-MERIT Discussion Paper No. 2020-015
Taking the challenge: A joint European policy response to the corona crisis to strengthen the public sector and restart a more sustainable and social Europe
by Jo Ritzen, Javi Lopez, André Knottnerus, Salvador Pérez-Moreno, George Papandreou & Klaus F. Zimmermann

• Strong & social Europe
• Joint Euro area monetary funding
• Joint Euro area borrowing conditional on strong commitments for sustainable development
• Better public sector with joint taxation
• Sound fiscal behavior
• Full employment strategy with vocational training, retraining
• Free internal mobility, open labor immigration policy; joint refugee policy.
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Should Wages and Prices Grow Faster in Germany?

A new GLO Discussion Paper presents a model which shows that wages, prices and real income should grow faster in countries with low increase in their labor force.

The Global Labor Organization (GLO) is an independent, non-partisan and non-governmental organization that functions as an international network and virtual platform to stimulate global research, debate and collaboration.

GLO Discussion Paper No. 620, 2020

Divergence in Labour Force Growth: Should Wages and Prices Grow Faster in Germany?Download PDF
by
Beissinger, Thomas & Hellier, Joël & Marczak, Martyna

GLO Fellow Thomas Beissinger

Author Abstract: We develop a model which shows that wages, prices and real income should grow faster in countries with low increase in their labor force. If not, other countries experience growing unemployment and/or trade deficit. This result is applied to the case of Germany, which has displayed a significantly lower increase in its labour force than its trade partners, except in the moment of the reunification. By assuming that goods are differentiated according to their country of origin (Armington’s hypothesis), a low growth of the working population constrains the production of German goods, which entails an increase in their prices and in German wages. This mechanism is magnified by the low price elasticity of the demand for German goods. Hence, the German policy of wage moderation could severely constrain other countries’ policy options. The simulations of an extended model which encompasses offshoring to emerging countries and labor market imperfections suggest that (i) the impact of differences in labor force growth upon unemployment in Eurozone countries has been significant and (ii) the German demographic shock following unification could explain a large part of the 1995-2005 German economic turmoil.

GLO Discussion Papers are research and policy papers of the GLO Network which are widely circulated to encourage discussion. Provided in cooperation with EconStor, a service of the ZBW – Leibniz Information Centre for Economics, GLO Discussion Papers are among others listed in RePEc (see IDEAS,  EconPapers)Complete list of all GLO DPs – downloadable for free.

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Health Economics of Genetic Distance

A new GLO Discussion Paper presents a model where better-off individuals mate genetically close partners, and then use wealth to treat their children’s health problems.

The Global Labor Organization (GLO) is an independent, non-partisan and non-governmental organization that functions as an international network and virtual platform to stimulate global research, debate and collaboration.

GLO Discussion Paper No. 619, 2020

Health Economics of Genetic Distance Download PDF
by
Jelnov, Pavel

GLO Fellow Pavel Jelnov

Author Abstract: In this note, I address the trade-off between children’s health and parental preference toward similarity with children. In my model, better-off individuals mate genetically close partners and then use wealth to treat their children’s health problems, caused by inbreeding depression. As a result, the relationship between parental wealth and children’s health includes decreasing portions. Siblings health inequality is also nonmonotonically related to parental wealth, if parents discriminate in favor of more similar children.

GLO Discussion Papers are research and policy papers of the GLO Network which are widely circulated to encourage discussion. Provided in cooperation with EconStor, a service of the ZBW – Leibniz Information Centre for Economics, GLO Discussion Papers are among others listed in RePEc (see IDEAS,  EconPapers)Complete list of all GLO DPs – downloadable for free.

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The Critical Role of Social Identity in Covid-19 Lockdown-induced Job Losses in India

A new GLO Discussion Paper finds that all caste groups lost jobs in the first month of the Covid-19 lockdown, the job losses for lowest-ranked caste are greater by factor of three.

The Global Labor Organization (GLO) is an independent, non-partisan and non-governmental organization that functions as an international network and virtual platform to stimulate global research, debate and collaboration.

GLO Discussion Paper No. 622, 2020

Is Covid-19 “The Great Leveler”? The Critical Role of Social Identity in Lockdown-induced Job LossesDownload PDF
by
Deshpande, Ashwini & Ramachandran, Rajesh

GLO Fellow Ashwini Deshpande

Author Abstract: Using nationally representative panel data for 21,799 individuals between May 2018 and April 2020, this paper investigates whether the Covid-19 pandemic was indeed a “Great Leveler” in the sense that it imposed similar and equivalent labour market shocks on different caste groups. We find that while all caste groups lost jobs in the first month of the lockdown, the job losses for lowest-ranked caste are greater by factor of three. The data shows that the disproportionate effects stems from lower levels of human capital and over-representation in vulnerable jobs for the lowest ranked caste groups in the country.

More from the GLO Coronavirus Cluster

GLO Discussion Papers are research and policy papers of the GLO Network which are widely circulated to encourage discussion. Provided in cooperation with EconStor, a service of the ZBW – Leibniz Information Centre for Economics, GLO Discussion Papers are among others listed in RePEc (see IDEAS,  EconPapers)Complete list of all GLO DPs – downloadable for free.

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Excess Mortality as a Predictor of Mortality Crises: The Case of COVID-19 in Italy

A new GLO Discussion Paper using mortality data for Italy finds that the growth in total mortality rates can potentially be used as a statistically reliable predictor of mortality crises.

The Global Labor Organization (GLO) is an independent, non-partisan and non-governmental organization that functions as an international network and virtual platform to stimulate global research, debate and collaboration.

GLO Discussion Paper No. 618, 2020

Excess Mortality as a Predictor of Mortality Crises: The Case of COVID-19 in Italy Download PDF
by
Ceriani, Lidia & Verme, Paolo

GLO Fellow Paolo Verme

Author Abstract: The paper provides initial evidence that excess mortality rates by locality can be used as a statistically reliable predictor of looming mortality crises. Using recently published daily deaths figures for 7,357 Italian municipalities, we estimate the growth in daily mortality rates between the period 2015-2019 and 2020 by province. All provinces that experienced a major mortality shock in mid-March 2020 had increases in mortality rates of 100% or above already in mid-February 2020. This increase was particularly strong for males and older people, two recognizable features of COVID-19. Using panel data models, we find a strong positive and significant association between overall deaths and COVID-19 related deaths, and between early increases in mortality rates in February 2020 for any cause and the March 2020 outbreak in COVID-19 deaths. We conclude that the growth in mortality rates can potentially be used as a statistically reliable predictor of mortality crises, including COVID- 19 crises.

More from the GLO Coronavirus Cluster

GLO Discussion Papers are research and policy papers of the GLO Network which are widely circulated to encourage discussion. Provided in cooperation with EconStor, a service of the ZBW – Leibniz Information Centre for Economics, GLO Discussion Papers are among others listed in RePEc (see IDEAS,  EconPapers)Complete list of all GLO DPs – downloadable for free.

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Taste or statistics: What does the literature say about ethnic labor market discrimination?

A new GLO Discussion Paper surveys the empirical literature to find that taste-based discrimination can better explain ethnic discrimination in hiring than statistical discrimination.

The Global Labor Organization (GLO) is an independent, non-partisan and non-governmental organization that functions as an international network and virtual platform to stimulate global research, debate and collaboration.

GLO Discussion Paper No. 615, 2020

Is labour market discrimination against ethnic minorities better explained by taste or statistics? A systematic review of the empirical evidenceDownload PDF
by
Lippens, Louis & Baert, Stijn & Ghekiere, Abel & Verhaeghe, Pieter-Paul & Derous, Eva

GLO Fellow Stijn Baert

Author Abstract: Scholars have gone to great lengths to chart the incidence of ethnic labour market discrimination. To effectively mitigate this discrimination, however, we need to understand its underlying mechanisms because different mechanisms lead to different counteracting measures. To this end, we reviewed the recent literature that confronts the seminal theories of taste-based and statistical discrimination against the empirical reality. First, we observed that the measurement operationalisation of the mechanisms varied greatly between studies, necessitating the development of a measurement standard. Second, we found that 20 out of 30 studies examining taste-based discrimination and 18 out of 34 studies assessing statistical discrimination produced supportive evidence for said mechanisms. However, (field) experimental research, which predominantly focuses on hiring outcomes, yielded more evidence in favour of taste-based vis-à-vis statistical discrimination, suggesting that the taste-based mechanism might better explain ethnic discrimination in hiring.

GLO Discussion Papers are research and policy papers of the GLO Network which are widely circulated to encourage discussion. Provided in cooperation with EconStor, a service of the ZBW – Leibniz Information Centre for Economics, GLO Discussion Papers are among others listed in RePEc (see IDEAS,  EconPapers)Complete list of all GLO DPs – downloadable for free.

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