Dorothea Schäfer is the new Editor-in-Chief of the Eurasian Economic Review. Interview with her about her publication perspectives in the area of labor economics.

As of January 2019, the Eurasian Economic Review (EAER) has a new Editor-in-Chief, Dorothea Schäfer. EAER is one of the flagship journals of the Eurasia Business and Economics Society (EBES), which partners with the Global Labor Organization (GLO). Under the leadership of Schäfer, the EAER, while focusing on macro analysis and financial markets in general, also seeks to attract high quality research papers in macro labor and on the interrelationships between financial and labor markets. Klaus F. Zimmermann asked Dorothea Schäfer about her plans in a GLO Interview.

GLO: In your new role as Editor-in-Chief, where do you see the focus of the EAER under your leadership?

Dorothea Schäfer: The focus of EAER will be on financial markets and applied macro research. The journal has a broad scope in both focus areas. Finance topics may address such issues as financial systems and regulation, corporate and start-up finance, macro and sustainable finance, finance and innovations, consumer finance, public policies within local, regional, national and international contexts towards financial markets, money and banking and the interface of labor and financial economics. Macro economic research includes topics from monetary economics, labor economics, international economics and development economics, preferably but not exclusively, with a link to finance. Typically, the articles published in EAER highlight the economic, political and societal relevance of research results.

GLO: The challenges for the well-being of the world are not smaller today, than after the Great Recession. What can a journal like the EAER contribute to deal with those challenges?

Dorothea Schäfer: Asian countries were exposed to a deep financial crisis 10 years before the Lehman insolvency and had a long way to go before they recovered. Severe deficiencies in financial markets and financial regulations triggered the Lehman failure and the subsequent Great Recession.  Many countries have still not fully recovered and new macro risks from trade wars, Brexit and a general loss of trust have evolved. Financial markets are part of those problems, but will also be part of the solutions. Therefore, understanding financial markets is of ever increasing importance for the well-being of the world. The EAER aims to support building the crucial knowledge by publishing rigorous, high-quality research.

GLO: What kind of papers do you wish to attract for EAER from researcher dealing with human resources issues?

Dorothea Schäfer: Papers dealing with the interaction between labor and financial markets are particularly welcome. But since the Journal has a macro focus in addition to finance articles on labor market issues in general are of interest for the journal.

Short Bio

Dorothea Schäfer, Dr. in Economics and habilitation in Business Economics, Research Director Financial Markets at the German Institute for Economic Research (DIW Berlin), Adjunct Professor of Jönköping International Business School, Jönköping University (Sweden); Research Fellow of the Center for Relationship Banking and Economics CERBE, Roma, Italy. She is the Editor-in-Chief of the Eurasian Economics Review and a Fellow of the Global Labor Organization (GLO).

Head of various research projects, inter alia, funded by the Leibniz Research Alliance Crises in a Globalised World, the Research Foundation of the German Savings banks, German Science Foundation, the EU Commission, the Fritz Thyssen Stiftung and the Stiftung Geld und Währung; Evaluator/reviewer of research programs/proposals for the German Science Foundation (DFG), EU Commission (Marie Skłodowska-Curie Individual Fellowships), the Federal Ministry of Education and Research (BMBF) and the LOEWE (Initiative for the Development of Scientific and Economic Excellence, State of Hesse).

She has published in Finance Research Letters, European Journal of Finance, Small Business Economics, Journal of Financial Stability, International Journal of Money and Finance, German Economic Review, Economics of Transition, the Journal of Comparative Economics, Journal of Institutional and Theoretical Economics and many other journals. Schäfer gave expert testimonies for the Commission to Review the Financing for the phase-out of nuclear energy in 2015, for the Finance Committee of the German Parliament (Deutsche Bundestag) (2010, 2011, 2012, 2018) and for the Committee on Social Affairs, Health and Sustainable Development, Parliamentary Assembly, The Council of Europe (2012). In 2012, she was also advisor to the Sub-Committee “Policy for a Sustainable Political and Economic Governance” (Nachhaltige Ordnungspolitik) of the Enquete Committee of the German Parliament, “Growth – Prosperity – Quality of Life” (Wachstum Wohlstand Lebensqualität).

In 2001 Schäfer and her co-author Franz Hubert received the Best Paper Award of the German Finance Association and 2002 the Best Paper Award of DIW Berlin. Main research interests are: financial and banking markets, systems and regulation, financial crisis, financial constraints, start-up finance and innovation, finance and labor, sovereign debt and Euro Area, gender and financial markets, household finance, green finance, crowd financing.  Schäfer ranks in the European Union among the top 6% of researcher according to the RePEc ranking analysis in January 2019.

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Migration supports economic recovery in recessions

Issue 2019/1 of the Journal of Population Economics is published: Please see for the Table of Content: Volume 32, Issue 1, January 2019

The Lead Article is about:
Migration as an adjustment mechanism in the crisis? A comparison of Europe and the United States 2006–2016

Authors: Julia Jauer, Thomas Liebig, John P. Martin, Patrick A. Puhani

Abstract

” We estimate whether migration can be an equilibrating force in the labour market by comparing pre- and post-crisis migration movements at the regional level in both Europe and the United States, and their association with asymmetric labour market shocks. Based on fixed-effects regressions using regional panel data, we find that Europe’s migratory response to unemployment shocks was almost identical to that recorded in the United States after the crisis. Our estimates suggest that, if all measured population changes in Europe were due to migration for employment purposes—i.e. an upper-bound estimate—up to about a quarter of the asymmetric labour market shock would be absorbed by migration within a year. However, in Europe and especially in the Eurozone, the reaction to a very large extent stems from migration of recent EU accession country citizens as well as of third-country nationals.”

Read also open access for a short period:

Yoo-Mi Chin & Nicholas Wilson, Disease risk and fertility: evidence from the HIV/AIDS pandemic, Journal of Population Economics, 31 (2018), 429–451.

Kuznets Prize Winner 2019.
The paper is freely downloadable for a short period. The Award Study shows that a rise in the disease risk increases the total fertility rate and the number of surviving children, a finding which has important policy implications.

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Immigration restrictions reduce cultural assimilation in the next generation

Issue 2019/1 of the Journal of Population Economics is published: Please see for the Table of Content: Volume 32, Issue 1, January 2019

The article in the new issue

Immigration restrictions and second-generation cultural assimilation: theory and quasi-experimental evidence

By Fausto Galli, Giuseppe Russo; pp. 23-51

Abstract

“We study the effects of immigration restrictions on the cultural assimilation of second-generation migrants. In our theoretical model, when mobility is free, individuals with a stronger taste for their native culture migrate temporarily. When immigration is restricted, however, these individuals are incentivized to relocate permanently. Permanent emigrants procreate in the destination country and convey their cultural traits to the second generation, who will therefore find assimilation harder. We test this prediction by using the 1973 immigration ban in Germany (Anwerbestopp) as a quasi-experiment. Since the ban only concerned immigrants from countries outside the European Economic Community, they act as a treatment group. According to our estimates, the Anwerbestopp has reduced the cultural assimilation of the second generation. This result demonstrated robustness to several checks. We conclude that restrictive immigration policies may have the unintended consequence of delaying the intergenerational process of cultural assimilation. “

Read further open access for a short period:

Yoo-Mi Chin & Nicholas Wilson, Disease risk and fertility: evidence from the HIV/AIDS pandemic, Journal of Population Economics, 31 (2018), 429–451.

Kuznets Prize Winner 2019.
The paper is freely downloadable for a short period. The Award Study shows that a rise in the disease risk increases the total fertility rate and the number of surviving children, a finding which has important policy implications.

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HIV/AIDS pandemic and fertility response: Research on Africa

The Kuznets Prize Paper of the Journal of Population Economics was announced and given at the #ASSA2019 meeting in Atlanta. The Award Study shows that a rise in the disease risk increases the total fertility rate and the number of surviving children, a finding which has important policy implications. In every year, the Prize is selected by the Editors of the Journal among the papers published in the previous year. List of Kuznets Prize winners.

The paper is freely downloadable for a short period.

Yoo-Mi Chin & Nicholas Wilson, Disease risk and fertility: evidence from the HIV/AIDS pandemic, Journal of Population Economics, 31 (2018), 429–451.

Yoo-Mi Chin

Interview with Author Yoo-Mi Chin, Professor of Economics at Baylor University

GLO: Is a rise of fertility after a disaster not the expected proper Malthusian response?

Yoo-Mi Chin: It is ambiguous whether we can clearly expect a Malthusian response to the HIV/AIDS pandemic. It is true that population might recover from a positive check like diseases by increasing fertility. But after all, HIV is a sexually transmitted disease, and proliferation of HIV may lower fertility by inducing the use of contraception for safe sex. Further, HIV takes a heavy toll on working age adults. Like we see in the case of Black Death, as large-scale mortality causes labor shortages and subsequent higher wages, more women participate in labor market, which would lead to lower fertility. On the other hand, it is also possible that higher wages generate an income effect on the number of children. A lower life expectancy may increase fertility through lower returns to education and the child quantity-quality trade-off. Given such theoretical ambiguity, we find that an empirical examination of the issue is warranted.

GLO: How is fertility affected by a rise in the disease risk?

Yoo-Mi Chin: We find that a doubling of HIV prevalence increased total fertility rate by approximately 1.37 births and increased surviving children by approximately 0.38 children, using distance to the origin of the pandemic as an instrument for HIV prevalence. Although HIV/AIDS likely has increased child mortality, our findings suggest that the increase in births exceeded the increase in child mortality.

GLO: What are the policy implications?

Yoo-Mi Chin: The rise of the HIV/AIDS pandemic appears to have increased total fertility and the number of surviving children. Although the net effect of the pandemic on GDP per capita needs to be more thoroughly examined in future research, the increases in total fertility and the number of surviving children coupled with high mortality of working age adults could potentially lead to increases in dependency ratios and decreases in GDP per capita. Our results suggest that positive externalities generated by HIV prevention efforts might be larger than previously thought in that they contribute not only to reductions in HIV prevalence but also to reductions in total fertility, which could potentially enhance future welfare. Therefore, more resources for HIV prevention efforts are warranted.

The Story

Yoo-Mi Chin & Nicholas Wilson, Disease risk and fertility: evidence from the HIV/AIDS pandemic, Journal of Population Economics, 31 (2018), 429–451.

The paper is freely downloadable for a short period.

Abstract: A fundamental question about human behavior is whether fertility responds to disease risk. The standard economic theory of household fertility decision-making generates ambiguous predictions, and the response has large implications for human welfare. We examine the fertility response to the HIV/AIDS pandemic using national household survey data from 14 sub-Saharan African countries. Instrumental variable (IV) estimates using distance to the origin of the pandemic suggest that HIV/AIDS has increased the total fertility rate (TFR) and the number of surviving children. These results rekindle the debate about the fertility response to disease risk, particularly the HIV/AIDS pandemic, and highlight the question of whether the HIV/AIDS pandemic has reduced GDP per capita.

The Author

Yoo-Mi Chin is an Assistant Professor of Economics at Baylor University with a Ph.D. from Brown University. She is also a Fellow of the Global Labor Organization (GLO). Most of her research focuses on the analysis of domestic violence. She has published her previous work in the Journal of Applied Statistics, the Journal of Health Economics, and World Development, among other outlets. Prior to joining Baylor University, she was an Assistant Professor at the Missouri University of Science & Technology.

YOO-Mi Chin and Editor-in-Chief Klaus F. Zimmermann during the award ceremony in Atlanta

2019 Journal of Population Economics: Issues

Issue 2019/1: Is already out! Please see Table of Content: Volume 32, Issue 1, January 2019

The Lead Article is about:
Migration as an adjustment mechanism in the crisis? A comparison of Europe and the United States 2006–2016

Issue 2019/2: Will be out in a few weeks. See forthcoming announcements.

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More Research Leaders at the Global Labor Organization (GLO)

The Global Labor Organization (GLO) announces a new Research Cluster on Development, Health, Inequality and Behavior and a new Country Lead for Switzerland.

The GLO Research Cluster Lead for Development, Health, Inequality and Behavior is  Kompal Sinha. She is a Senior Lecturer and HDR Director at the Department of Economics of Macquarie University, Australia. Sinha is also an Associate Editor of the Journal of Population Economics. Her research deals with economic effects of consumer behavior, particularly in the area of health economics and development economics and the impacts on the design of economic policy.

Rainer Winkelmann is the GLO Country Lead Switzerland. He is a Professor of Economics at the University of Zurich, Switzerland. He is a prominent researcher in the areas of count data econometrics and the economics of wellbeing. His research paper “Why Are the Unemployed So Unhappy?” (with Liliana Winkelmann) has received nearly 1,900 Google cites; his textbook Econometric analysis of count data many more than 1,500 Google cites. He also joins the Editorial Board of the Journal of Population Economics as an Associate Editor.

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USA: Miami Beach and #ASSA2019 – Back to Bonn

Returning to Bonn on January 7 from a lovely Christmas/New Year holiday trip to Miami Beach and from an inspiring business trip to Atlanta to participate at #ASSA2019 giving the Kuznets Prize of the Journal of Population Economics.

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Zimmermann discussed journal issues with publishers from Springer Nature at #ASSA2019.

January 4-6, GLO President Klaus F. Zimmermann, UNU-MERIT Maastricht, had visited the #ASSA2019 conference in Atlanta. The conference enables also networking with a larger number of publishers who are available for discussion with their journals and books in a specific exhibition open to the conference participants.

Zimmermann is associated with a number of Springer Nature Journals. He is Editor-in-Chief of the Journal of Population Economics and Associate Editor or member of the Editorial Board of the following outlets affiliated with Springer Nature: International Economics and Economic Policy, Indian Journal of Labour Economics, Romanian Journal of Economic Forecasting, Eurasian Economic Review and Comparative Economic Studies.

BELOW: Discussing the strong performance of the Journal of Population Economics with Barbara Fess from Springer Nature at #ASSA2019. The Journal publishes international research on the economics of population, household, and human resources.

Barbara Fess & Klaus F. Zimmermann

BELOW: Discussing the strong development of the Research Journal Comparative Economic Studies at #ASSA2019: Katie Hall, Associate Editor at Palgrave Macmillan & Springer Nature with Editor Nauro Campos, Brunel University London, and Klaus F. Zimmermann, UNU-MERIT, Maastricht, Bonn University and Member of the Editorial Board. Zimmermann is President of the Global Labor Organisation (GLO), Campos is also GLO Fellow.

From the left: Zimmermann, Hall and Campos

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Kuznets Prize given at the #ASSA2019 meeting: The Award Study shows that a rise in the disease risk increases the total fertility rate and the number of surviving children. This has important policy implications.

The Kuznets Prize Paper of the Journal of Population Economics in a particular year is selected by the Editors of the Journal among the papers published in the previous year. Then the winners will be presented in a prize ceremony. This year the winners remained confidential until January 4, 2019.

The Kuznets Prize Ceremony 2019 took place at a Reception of the Institute for Economic and Social Research (IESR) of Jinan University on Friday January 4, 2019 as part of the ASSA 2019 Atlanta conference of the American economists, which is probably the largest gathering of academic economists in the world with typically far more than 10,000 participants. Very many friends of the Global Labor Organization (GLO) and the Journal of Population Economics who were participating at ASSA2019 followed the invitation of Dean Shuaizhang Feng, Head of the Institute for Economic and Social Research (IESR), who is also a GLO Fellow. A larger number of prominent economists participated, including many Editorial Board Members of the Journal of Population Economics and Kuznets Prize winners of previous years.

The Story

Yoo-Mi Chin & Nicholas Wilson, Disease risk and fertility: evidence from the HIV/AIDS pandemic, Journal of Population Economics, 31 (2018), 429–451.

Abstract: A fundamental question about human behavior is whether fertility responds to disease risk. The standard economic theory of household fertility decision-making generates ambiguous predictions, and the response has large implications for human welfare. We examine the fertility response to the HIV/AIDS pandemic using national household survey data from 14 sub-Saharan African countries. Instrumental variable (IV) estimates using distance to the origin of the pandemic suggest that HIV/AIDS has increased the total fertility rate (TFR) and the number of surviving children. These results rekindle the debate about the fertility response to disease risk, particularly the HIV/AIDS pandemic, and highlight the question of whether the HIV/AIDS pandemic has reduced GDP per capita.

The Authors

Yoo-Mi Chin is an Assistant Professor of Economics at Baylor University with a Ph.D. from Brown University. She is also a Fellow of the Global Labor Organization (GLO). Most of her research focuses on the analysis of domestic violence. She has published her previous work in the Journal of Applied Statistics, the Journal of Health Economics, and World Development, among other outlets. Prior to joining Baylor University, she was an Assistant Professor at the Missouri University of Science & Technology.

Nicholas Wilson is a Fellow with the Office of Evaluation Sciences, an Associate Professor of Economics at Reed College and the Chair of the Department of Economics. He is also a Fellow of the Global Labor Organization (GLO). His research focuses on fundamental puzzles about human behavior in the context of health, development, and behavioral economics. Prior to joining Reed College, he was a Visiting Scholar at the University of California, Berkeley and an Assistant Professor of Economics at Williams College. He has published a larger number of papers in journals including the American Economic Review, Demography, Economics & Human Biology, Journal of Development Economics and Journal of Health Economics.

The Ceremony

Shuaizhang Feng, Head of the Institute for Economic and Social Research (IESR) of Jinan University and GLO Fellow introduced the Institute and warmly welcomed the Kuznets Prize Ceremony. Then Klaus F. Zimmermann, GLO President and Editor-in-Chief presented and explained the prize paper and introduced the authors. Yoo-Mi Chin received the prize for both authors.

Yoo-Mi Chin & Klaus F. Zimmermann at the Prize Ceremony

Shuaizhang Feng & Klaus F. Zimmermann heading the Prize Ceremony

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Madeline Zavodny is Managing Editor of the Journal of Population Economics. Shuaizhang Feng and Kompal Sinha are Associate Editors.

Friends of the Global Labor Organization (GLO) and the Journal of Population Economics participating at the ASSA 2019 Atlanta conference of the American economists attended the Reception of the Institute for Economic and Social Research (IESR) of Jinan University on Friday January 4, 2019. They came on the invitation of Dean Shuaizhang Feng, Head of the Institute for Economic and Social Research (IESR), who is also a GLO Fellow.

In front of a large crowd of ASSA participants including many GLO Fellows and Editorial Board Members of the Journal of Population Economics, Klaus F. Zimmermann, GLO President and Editor-in-Chief of the Journal of Population Economics announced some changes in the editorial staff of the Journal. As of January 2019, Madeline Zavodny moved from the position of Associate Editor to Managing Editor joining Michaella Vanore in this role.

Last summer, Oded Galor had already changed roles from Associate Editor to Editor. The two free positions of Associate Editors are now filled: Zimmermann, indicating more changes to come soon, announced that Shuaizhang Feng and Kompal Sinha of Macquarie University have taken these seats. All are GLO Fellows. He warmly welcomed all in the team.

Madeline Zavodny is a Professor of Economics at the University of North Florida. Her research concentrates on economic issues related to immigration and the economic and demographic effects of immigration policies. She is a member of the editorial board of the International Migration Review and has served as co-editor of the Southern Economic Journal and a board member of the American Economic Association’s Committee on the Status of Women in the Economics Profession. She received a Ph.D. in economics from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology and a B.A. in economics from Claremont McKenna College. She has frequently published in journals like the American Economic Review, Demography, Journal of Labor Economics, Health Economics, Journal of Health Economics, International Migration Review and the Journal of Development Economics. See her personal website for further information.

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Klaus F. Zimmermann participates at the ASSA meeting in Atlanta January 4 – 6, 2019.

On January 3, Klaus F. Zimmermann has left his holiday resort at Miami Beach to participate at the ASSA 2019 Atlanta conference of the American economists. In his role as the President of the Global Labor Organization (GLO), he will discuss research and policy issues and will be available throughout the conference.

On the flight

He will attend the Reception of the Institute for Economic and Social Research (IESR) of Jinan University, on Friday January 4, 2019, which takes place from 6pm to 8pm, at Hilton Atlanta 217.

Friends of GLO and the Journal of Population Economics participating at ASSA 2019 are invited to this reception and to the prominent Kuznets Prize ceremony, which takes place in the IESR Reception. The Kuznets Prize in a particular year is given to the author(s) of the best paper published in the previous year as judged by the editors. The ceremony will start at about 6.30 pm and will take about 15 minutes. Klaus F. Zimmermann who is also the Editor-in-Chief of the Journal of Population Economics, will announce some journal news including the 2019 prize winner(s). Then the award plate will be given to the author(s).

The Kuznets Prize ceremony takes place on the invitation of Dean Shuaizhang Feng, Head of the Institute for Economic and Social Research (IESR), who is also a GLO Fellow. A larger number of prominent economists will participate at the reception, including many Editorial Board Members of the Journal of Population Economics and Kuznets Prize winners of previous years.

Zimmermann had been a few times in Atlanta before. In October 2013 he was visiting the Andrew Young School of Policy Studies at Georgia State University and provided a public speech.



Klaus F. Zimmermann during his public speech on 4 October 2013 at Georgia State University, Atlanta/USA, while visiting the Andrew Young School of Policy Studies

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