GLO President Zimmermann speaks at legendary Rockefeller Bellagio Center & in Milan

Zimmermann is a 2017 Rockefeller Foundation Policy Fellow. He is currently visiting the Bellagio Center to execute research, engage in discussions and provide seminars and lectures.

The Rockefeller Foundation Bellagio Residency Program offers distinguished academics, artists, thought leaders, policymakers, and practitioners a serene setting conducive to focused, goal-oriented work, and the unparalleled opportunity to establish new connections with fellow residents from a wide array of backgrounds, disciplines, and geographies. The hospitality and impact of The Bellagio Center in Italy has been legendary.

Klaus F. Zimmermann, Princeton University and UNU-MERIT, Maastricht University, has been granted Rockefeller Foundation Policy Fellow to visit the Bellagio Center in October 2017 to execute his research and discuss it with his fellow residents. Zimmermann, who is also the President of the Global Labor Organization (GLO), works on migration and global labor economics.

On 4 October 2017, Zimmermann gave a paper at the Bellagio Center on “Challenges of Migration Policy Advice“. On 5 October 2017, he provided a public lecture on “The European Migration Challenge after the German Elections” at the Università Cazzolica del Sacro Cuore, Milano.

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Zimmermann  at the Bellagio Center of the Rockfeller Foundation before he gave a presentation on October 4, 2017 on “Challenges of Migration Policy Advice“.  

Zimmermann at the Università Cazzolica del Sacro Cuore, Milano, with GLO Fellow Marco Vivarelli, Professor and Director of the Institute of Economic Policy of the Università Cattolica del Sacro Cuore, Milano. On 5 October 2017, after he provided a public lecture on “The European Migration Challenge after the German Elections“.

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Call for papers on “Sexual Orientation and the Labor Market”

Call for papers for a special issue of the International Journal of Manpower  on: “Sexual Orientation and the Labor Market

Edited by

Nick Drydakis (Anglia Ruskin University, University of Cambridge, IZA, and GLO) and Klaus F. Zimmermann (UNU-MERIT, Maastricht University, CEPR and GLO)

An initiative of the Global Labor Organization (GLO), this project is related to the GLO Thematic Cluster on “Gender, Gender Identity, Sexual Orientation and Labor Market Outcomes” headed by Nick Drydakis.

Despite the enactment, in English speaking countries and the EU, of labor legislation against discrimination in the labor market based on sexual orientation, LGBTI (lesbian, gay, bisexual, trans and intersex) people continue to experience occupational access constraints, lower job satisfaction, wage discrimination (especially gay men), and more bullying and harassment than their heterosexual counterparts (Drydakis, 2014; Valfort, 2017).

Studies for the period 1989–2014 suggest that gay men receive lower wages than heterosexual men of comparable education, skills, and experience. For instance, studies find that gay men earn from 4–5% less than heterosexual men in the Netherlands, France, Greece, and the UK and up to 12–16% less in Canada, Sweden, and the US (Drydakis, 2014). Whether wage discrimination against gay men exists in other regions is of great interest and ascertaining this is of importance for policy interventions. In addition, whether wage discrimination lessens over time in response to policy interventions and legislation is hard to determine in the absence of relevant studies. It is not yet clear whether prejudice-based and/or statistical discrimination is the more appropriate framework for the study of labor discrimination against LGBTI people.

The available studies on sexual orientation and job satisfaction highlight that in Australia, Canada, and Greece, both gay men and lesbians experience lower job satisfaction than do their otherwise similar heterosexual counterparts (Drydakis, 2014). Because gay and lesbian employees face severe workplace harassment and bullying, these conditions may affect their workplace experience evaluations (Drydakis, 2014). Whether factors other than workplace harassment cause gay and lesbian employees’ dissatisfaction requires examination. Also, for instituting appropriate policy actions, it is important to determine whether these job satisfaction differences suffered by sexual orientation minorities exist in other countries.

In general, the dearth of studies makes it difficult to examine how education, occupation, industrial relations, region, core socio-economic characteristics, personality and mental health traits moderate the relationship between sexual orientation and labor market outcomes (Drydakis, 2014). Indeed, although studies suggest that lesbians face prejudice in the labor market, some studies estimate that lesbians earn more than comparable heterosexual women. Lesbians have been found to earn 3% more in the Netherlands, 8% more in the UK, 11% more in Germany, 15% more in Canada, and 20% more in the US. Whether personality characteristics, coping strategies, occupational choices, family structures and/or region positively affect lesbians’ wages is still an open question.

In addition, quantitative research on employment outcomes is scarce for trans people (Drydakis, 2017). A representative study suggests that trans people tend to suffer higher unemployment rates than those reported, in other studies, for the general U.S. population (Leppel, 2016). In addition, the interaction between trans identity, and sexual orientation, and the effects of this on employment outcomes is under-examined (Drydakis, 2017). Whether explicit, legislative employment protection against discrimination on the ground of a trans identity has an effect on employment outcomes has also received little attention (Drydakis, 2017).

Given the aforementioned lack of sufficient literature, the editors welcome empirical papers on labor economics which have a clear and highlighted added value, and solid policy implications, on the following general areas:

  • Testing, in under-examined geographical regions, for wage discrimination based on sexual orientation.
  • Empirically testing and disentangling the forms of employment discrimination (i.e. prejudice-based, and/or statistical discrimination) against LGBTI people.
  • Examining the relationship between sexual orientation, personality characteristics, mental health and employment outcomes.
  • Assessing how moderators (i.e. human capital, educational choices, occupations, family structure, industrial relations etc.) affect the relationship between sexual orientation and labor market outcomes.
  • Testing the relationship between sexual orientation, past/present victimization and labor market outcomes.
  • Quantifying the relationship between sexual orientation and job satisfaction.
  • Evaluating the impact of the legal recognition of same-sex couples on labor market outcomes.
  • Evaluating the impact of employment legislation against sexual orientation and trans identity discrimination on labor market outcomes.
  • Quantifying employment bias against trans people.
  • Examining the interaction between trans identities, sexual orientation and labor market outcomes.

Submissions will be accepted up until the 31th of August 2018. They should be made using ScholarOne Manuscripts, the online submission and peer review system: http://mc.manuscriptcentral.com/ijm. Before submission, please verify that you have carefully read the Author guidelines of the Journal. While making your submission, please specify the title of the current call for papers. See also the forthcoming call on the journal website.

Nick Drydakis (Anglia Ruskin University, University of Cambridge, IZA and GLO)

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and Klaus F. Zimmermann (UNU-MERIT, Maastricht University, CEPR and GLO)

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References:

Drydakis N. (2014). Sexual orientation and labor market outcomes. IZA World of Labor: 111. DOI: 10.15185/izawol.111

Drydakis N. (2017). Trans people, well-being, and labor market outcomes. IZA World of Labor: 386. DOI: 10.15185/izawol.386

Leppel, K. (2016). The labor force status of transgender men and women. International Journal of Transgenderism,  Vol. 17, No. (3−4), pp. 155−164.

Valfort, M. (2017). LGBTI in OECD countries: A review. OECD Social, Employment and Migration Working Papers, No. 198, OECD Publishing, Paris. DOI: 10.1787/d5d49711-en

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GLO session on “Issues in Global Labor” at Transilvania University of Brasov Conference

The Faculty of Economic Sciences and Business Administration within Transilvania University of Brasov, in collaboration with the Institute for Economic Forecasting within the National Institute for Economic Research “Costin C. Kiritescu” of the Romanian Academy organizes the International Conference

„Inclusive and sustainable economic growth. Challenges, measures and solutions” (ISEG 2017).

GLO Fellows Monica Raileanu Szeles and Lucian Liviu Albu of the Institute for Economic Forecasting are involved in organizing the conference. The conference will be hosted by Transilvania University of Brasov and will be held 20-21 October 2017 in the Transilvania University Hall, Street Iuliu Maniu no. 47A, Brasov.

GLO President Klaus F. Zimmermann will provide a keynote on “Migration and Well-Being”. There will be further a GLO session:

GLO Session: Issues in Global Labor: Chair: Klaus F. Zimmermann (UNU-MERIT Maastricht and GLO)

“Overeducation wage penalty among Ph.D. holders: Does the field of study make the difference? An unconditional quantile regression analysis on Italian data”: Giuseppe Lucio Gaeta (University of Naples L’Orientale), Giuseppe Lubrano Lavadera (University of Salerno) and Francesco Pastore (University of Campania Luigi Vanvitelli and GLO)

“Remittances and Income Inequality in Nigeria: A Quantile Regression Analysis”: James T. Bang (St. Ambrose University and GLO), Aniruddha Mitra (Bard College and GLO) and Phanindra V. Wunnava (Middlebury College and GLO)

“Protection and Abuse of Property Rights: Political Culture Heritage in the Eastern European Post-Communist Society”: Camelia Florela Voinea (University of Bucharest and GLO)

From left to right …..

Francesco Pastore (University of Campania Luigi Vanvitelli and GLO)
Aniruddha Mitra (Bard College and GLO)
Camelia Florela Voinea (University of Bucharest and GLO)
Image result for Francesco Pastore PicturesImage result for Aniruddha Mitra PicturesImage result for Camelia Florela Voinea PicturesImage result for Klaus F. Zimmermann Pictures
Klaus F. Zimmermann (UNU-MERIT Maastricht and GLO)

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After the terrible earthquakes: Mexico needs relief efforts

The very successful last World Congress of the International Economic Association (IEA) took place June 19-23, 2017 in Mexico city with a large number of GLO Fellows attending. Among them were IEA President Kaushik Basu, Jackie Wahba, Corrado Giulietti, Martin Kahanec and GLO President Klaus F. Zimmermann.

In the meanwhile, a terrible earthquake has hit Mexico again and has also affected Mexico city. The research community is deeply concerned about this. On this occasion, IEA President and GLO Fellow  Kaushik Basu has written the following letter (together with IEA Past-President Tim Besley), which has the full GLO backing:

“Dear World Congress Participant,

I am sure like us you have been watching in horror at the events unfolding in Mexico as a result of the tragic earthquake.  It is all the more salient to those of us who only recently spent such a wonderful time in Mexico City at the IEA World Congress.  We thought, therefore, that you might wish to show solidarity with the victims by contributing to the relief effort.  Should you choose to do so, we include a list of web links below.

1. Los Topos Mexico: reputed and well-known NGO which specializes in rescuing people from the rubble.
You can donate to their PayPal account through their website:
www.topos.mx
Brigada de Rescate Topos Tlaltelolco a.C.

2. Cruz Roja: Mexico´s Red Cross.
You can donate to their PayPal account through their website:
www.cruzrojamexicana.org.mx
Cruz Roja Mexicana

 3. Amazon Wishlist: Look for the “Cruz Roja Mexico” wish list on Amazon.com or enter the following address into your web browser: https://www.amazon.com.mx/b?ie=UTF8&node=17290014011

Cruz Roja Mexicana en Amazon
www.amazon.com.mx
Dona a la Cruz Roja Mexicana

Yours sincerely,

Kaushik Basu (IEA President)

Tim Besley (IEA, Past President)”

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Update: Central European University (CEU) begins the 27th academic year

The Central European University (CEU) in Budapest has been under threat recently. The Global Labor Organization (GLO) and Klaus F. Zimmermann as the President of the GLO have supported the CEU with declarations and eventsAt the occasion of the Opening Ceremony 2017,  Michael Ignatieff, President and Rector of the CEU, has now declared:

“Dear Friends and Supporters,

We begin our 27th academic year at Central European University this week. At our 2017 Opening Ceremony, we welcomed 769 incoming students from 93 countries and recognized the extraordinary teaching and research taking place at CEU and elsewhere in Europe. Our community continues to inspire as we carry forward our mission to search for truth and add to the world’s precious stock of knowledge.

Your support enables this exciting work, and we thank you for your dedication to CEU even as we await the outcome of negotiations between the Hungarian government and the State of New York. I share my opening address below …. and welcome you to watch the video and read the full story here.”

 

“To the ambassadors and representatives of their countries
To the rectors and representatives of Hungarian universities.
To our hard-working faculty
To our dedicated staff
To our returning students
Welcome!

To the incoming CEU class of Masters and Doctoral students—all 769 of you from 93 countries—we hope CEU will be a transformative experience and we welcome you warmly to this community.

For we are a community, brought together as never before by our defense of academic freedom. Let me thank the entire CEU community for standing together, during what I like to call, with British understatement, ‘our little local difficulty.’

As many of you know, New York State, where we are accredited, and the Government of Hungary are negotiating an agreement that would enable us to stay in Budapest. Negotiations continue, but we remain hopeful that an agreement can be reached and ratified by the Hungarian Parliament.

This experience—still ongoing, still unresolved, but hopefully soon behind us—has changed us all. We have rediscovered why free institutions matter and why our open society mission is so important.

We are the only university with such a mission. What does it mean? Let’s be clear, first of all, what it doesn’t mean. It’s worth saying, once again, we’re not a political organization, we’re not an opposition movement, not an NGO. Though we encourage our students, staff, faculty, and alumni to be active citizens and to express their political convictions freely.

We ARE a university: a free, self-governing institution, independent of government, independent of those who finance us, a community of scholars and students whose task is to search for truth and to add to the world’s precious stock of knowledge.

And what is knowledge? The unbroken strand of understanding that human beings have woven together through experimentation, research and experience and that they have passed on from generation to generation.

Our mission as a university is to weave our tiny thread of knowledge into this strand of understanding and to pass it on unbroken to our children.

There is no single vision for an open society—that would violate the principle of openness itself—but all visions of an open society share a critical component: the belief in an epistemology of freedom: that the ideas we need most arise from critical debate and the courage to discard them when they fail the test of reality.

A university lives by this epistemology, but its goals are ethical. We are the institutions whose very essence is to create free people: responsible, prudent, moral human beings who do their best to care for their families, care for their country, care for each other.

An open society is a society of such men and women. Such people are skeptical but passionate citizens. They know the distinction between knowledge and opinion, between a fact and a rumor, between a tweet or a post and a research finding, between passion and sound judgment. Grasping the core of knowledge is hard. It is the work of a university every day, in every class: to teach men and women to make these distinctions, to do so fiercely, to subject all ideological claims—liberal and conservative alike—to the critical scrutiny that only knowledge of real life allows.

This is our mission. We hope you will feel it at work in our classrooms, in our lectures and seminars. We are an institution under constant scrutiny and external pressure. But that must not prevent us from being critical of ourselves. We re-examine our mission every day. We question whether we are measuring up. You will see that we are running a presidential lecture series entitled, Rethinking Open Society. Join us for these talks, form your own opinion about what open society means. The first one is on Monday, and guess who is starting it off: yours truly. So come, be critical. Join the debate.

In a moment you will hear a poem read, by one of the greatest spirits of our region and of our world, Czeslaw Milosz, the Polish Nobel Laureate in Literature. In it you will hear him say, “human reason guides our hand so we write Truth and Justice with capital letters, lie and oppression with small.” You will also hear a Kodaly song sung by a Hungarian artist. Their inclusion in this program is our way of saying: poetry, art, literature, music teach us our mission every day.

We will have a good year, together. I know it. We will argue, we will debate. The library will be full. Your heads will feel full with the pressure of new ideas. You will be changed.

So let us begin the year, proud of who we are: a community of men and women who love knowledge, learning, literature, art and who believe that when we work together, we can help each other on the arduous journey that is never over, the journey to become free men and women.”

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GLO Fellow Jo Ritzen on “A Second Chance for Europe” in Brussels

A book launch of ‘A Second chance for Europe: Economic, Political and Legal Perspectives of the European Union’, edited by Prof. Jo Ritzen.

The event will take place at the Maastricht University Campus Brussels on Wednesday 22 November 2017, in the presence of guests of honor Mr. Frans Timmermans, First Vice-President of the European Commission, Ms. Annemarie Penn-te Strake, Mayor of Maastricht, and Prof. Mathieu Segers, Professor of Contemporary European History and European Integration at Maastricht University.

FURTHER DETAILS on the book and the launch in Brussels.

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Haisken-DeNew of Melbourne University spoke at UNU-MERIT and celebrated in Cologne

On September 18, 2017, GLO Fellow John P. Haisken-DeNew of Melbourne University has visited POP at UNU-MERIT  and presented a paper in the UNU-MERIT/School of Governance Seminar at noon on:

Unawareness and Selective Disclosure: The Effect of School Quality Information on Property Prices

The seminar was chaired by Hugo Confraria (Joint UNU-MERIT/MGSoG Seminar Series); a larger number of UNU-MERIT students, researchers and professors were participating and generated a lively debate. Klaus F. Zimmermann, Co-Director of POP at UNU-MERIT and President of the Global Labor Organization (GLO) was also present.

John Haisken-DeNew (left), on a lecturing tour through Europe, now together with GLO President Klaus F. Zimmermann in front of UNU-MERIT in Maastricht.

After the hour…..:  John Haisken-DeNew and Klaus F. Zimmermann were celebrating a successful September 18, 2017 in the “Alte Wartesaal” close to the main station of Cologne.

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Meeting the Kangaroo: Traveling to Melbourne and Else

During November and December 2017, Klaus F. Zimmermann (UNU-MERIT and President of the Global Labor Organization (GLO) will be affiliated with Melbourne University after having received the prestigious Australian Eminent Research Scholar Award. Melbourne has just been marked the World’s most liveable city. Zimmermann will give public lectures and research seminars in Perth, Adelaide, Melbourne, Canberra, Wollongong and Sydney, among others.

As on previous visits, meeting Kangaroos, Australia’s national animal and emblem, seems unavoidable. A challenge with Kangaroos has been recently highlighted by Niall McCarthy in his article “Why Australians are Being Urged To Eat Kangaroo Meat”. Attributed to wet weather increasing the supply of food, the Kangaroo population has exploded in recent years, with a rise from 25 million in 2011 to an estimated 44.85 million. This is nearly twice the Australian human population of 24.6 million. However, human Australians are not endangered by this development.

Canberra was indeed the place where Zimmermann on his last visit to Australia met with Kangaroos on various levels.

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Zimmermann delivered keynote on Migration & Wellbeing in Kyiv

International Conference “People Matter: Quality of Life and Population Wellbeing in Post-Transition Economies organized by the Kyiv School of Economics and VoxUkraine on September 14-15, 2017 in Kyiv in Ukraine. Available: full program of the conference. The organizing committee of the conference included GLO Fellow Olena Nizalova (University of Kent), Yuri Gorodnichenko (University of California, Berkley), Tymofiy Mylovanov (Kyiv School of Economics and University of Pittsburgh), Mariya Aleksynska (ILO), and Olga Kupets (Kyiv School of Economics).

GLO Fellow Olena Nizalova (University of Kent), Conference Chair, while opening the conference:

Klaus F. Zimmermann (UNU-MERIT, Maastricht University and President of the Global Labor Organization – GLO) had provided a keynote lecture on “Migration and Wellbeing” on September 14. He also chaired a policy panel on “Migration caused by conflicts: Wellbeing of refugees and internally displaced people”.

In his keynote lecture, Zimmermann stressed his personal research interest dealing with Ukrainian issues. He had supported early on as former President of the German Institute for Economic Research (DIW Berlin) and as Founding Director of the Bonn-based Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA) the creation of the well-known and influential Ukrainian Longitudinal Monitoring Survey (ULMS). The creation of the data set was done by research teams headed by Hartmut Lehmann (University of Bologna), also present at the conference. On September 14, also an entire session of the event (ULMS: Peculiarities of Panel Data Collection in Post-Soviet Context) chaired by Olga Kupets (Kyiv School of Economics) discussed challenges of the ULMS data creation in the transition context.

Zimmermann underlined the visionary aspect of this venture and its big success. The survey is discussed in a review paper; Zimmermann was also involved in two papers dealing with the economic and political consequences of the Russian – Ukrainian ethnic divide in transition:

►H. Lehmann, A. Muravyev and K. F. Zimmermann: The Ukrainian Longitudinal Monitoring Survey: Towards a Better Understanding of Labor Markets in Transition, IZA Journal of Labor and Development, 1 (2012).

►A. Constant, M. Kahanec and K. F. Zimmermann: The Russian-Ukrainian Earnings Divide, Economics of Transition, 20 (2012), 1-35.

►A. Constant, M. Kahanec and K. F. Zimmermann: The Russian-Ukrainian Political Divide, Eastern European Economics, 49 (2011), 97-109.

Zimmmermann also mentioned his advisory work for the EU Commission, which lead also to the publication of an article about Ukrainian – German migration and the potentials for future migration flows:

►C. Biavaschi and K. F. Zimmermann: Eastern Partnership Migrants in Germany: Outcomes, Potentials and Challenges, IZA Journal of European Labor Studies, 3 (2014)

Unfortunately, IZA has terminated (“merged”) the publication of both journals, the IZA Journal of Labor and Development and IZA Journal of European Labor Studies in 2017 after Zimmermann had left IZA in 2016.

Klaus F. Zimmermann (UNU-MERIT and GLO)

 

In his conference keynote on “Migration & Wellbeing”, Zimmermann dealt with the following issues:

(1) The Value of Mobility

(2) GDP or Happiness?

(3) Measurement of Happiness and Wellbeing

(4) Research Questions

(5) Migration and the Wellbeing of the Natives

(6) Wellbeing of Migrants and Conditions at Home

(7) Migrants Abroad and the Wellbeing of the Left Behind

(8) Conclusions and Challenges

His overview was based on the following key publications:

(5) Wellbeing of the Natives:

►A. Akay, A. Constant and C. Giulietti: The Impact of Immigration on the Well-Being of Natives, Journal of Economic Behavior & Organization, (2014), 103, 72-92.

►A. Akay, A. Constant, C. Giulietti, and M. Guzi: Ethnic Diversity and Well-Being, Journal of Population Economics, (2017), 30, 265-306.

►M. Kuroki: Racial Diversity, Immigrants and the Well-being of Residents: Evidence from US Counties, Forthcoming, Journal of Population Economics, (2018). https://link.springer.com/article/10.1007/s00148-017-0657-9; GLO Discussion Paper, No. 76.

►N. B. Simpson, Happiness and Migration, in. A. Constant and K. F. Zimmermann (Eds.), International Handbook on the Economics of Migration, Edward Elgar, (2013), 393-407.

►W. Betz and N. B. Simpson, The Effects of International Migration on the Well-being of Native Populations in Europe, IZA Journal of Migration, 2013,2.

(6) Migrants’ Wellbeing and Macroeconomic Conditions

Akay, O. Bargain and K. F. Zimmermann: Home Sweet Home? Macroeconomic Conditions in Home Countries and the Well-Being of Migrants, Journal of Human Resources, 52 (2017), 351-373.

(7) Migrants Abroad and the Wellbeing of the Left Behind

Remittances:

►A. Akay, C. Giulietti, J.D. Robalino and K. F. Zimmermann: Remittances and Well-Being among Rural-to-Urban Migrants in China, Review of Economics of the Household, 12 (2014), 517-546.

► M. Akgüc, C. Giulietti and K. F.Zimmermann: The RUMiC Longitudinal Survey: Fostering Research on Labor Markets in China, IZA Journal of Labor & Development, 2014, 3:5

► A. Akay, O. Bargain, C. Guilietti, J. D. Robalino and K. F.Zimmermann: Remittances and Relative Concerns in Rural China, China Economic Review, 37 (2016), 191-207.

Social Remittances:

►M. Nikolova, M. Roman and K. F. Zimmermann: Left Behind but Doing Good? Civic Engagement in Two Post-Socialist Countries. Journal of Comparative Economics, 45 (2017), 658–684.

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How Property Prices are Affected by School Quality: GLO Fellow Haisken-DeNew speeks at UNU-MERIT on September 18.

GLO Fellow John P. Haisken-DeNew of Melbourne University will visit POP at UNU-MERIT on September 18, 2017. He will present a paper in the UNU-MERIT/School of Governance Seminar at noon (12:00 – 13:00) on:

Unawareness and Selective Disclosure: The Effect of School Quality Information on Property Prices

The venue will be the conference room 0.16&0.17. The seminar will be chaired by Hugo Confraria (Joint UNU-MERIT/MGSoG Seminar Series). Klaus F. Zimmermann, Co-Director of POP at UNU-MERIT and President of the Global Labor Organization (GLO) will be present.

Abstract

The Australian Government launched the My School website in 2010 to provide standardised information about the quality of schools to the Australian public. This paper combines data from this website with home sales data for the state of Victoria to estimate the effect of the publication of school quality information on property prices. We use a difference-in-difference approach to estimate the causal effect of the release of information about high-quality and low-quality schools relative to medium-quality schools in the neighborhood and find that the release of information about high-quality schools increases property prices by 3.6 percent, whereas the release of information about low-quality schools has no significant effect. The findings indicate that many buyers are unaware of the relevance of school quality information and that real estate agents pursue a strategy of disclosing information about high-quality schools to increase the sales price. Results from a survey of Victorian real estate agents provide evidence in favor of this strategy.

Further information on John P. Haisken – DeNew.

GLO Fellow John P. Haisken-DeNew

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